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Study English conversation skills with one of YouTube's most popular English as a Second (or third!) Language teachers, Rachel of Rachel's English. Most beneficial for intermediate to advanced students, Rachel's specialty is the nuance and musicality of spoken English. Learn about English stress, sounds, and melodies, in addition to American slang, idioms, phrasal verbs, vocabulary, common phrases, culture, and more! Each episode is a CONVERSATION, so join the conversation now and learn how ...
 
Join me, Tamsin, to smash some English language learning goals and flex your pronunciation muscles! English Sound Building is an advanced pronunciation podcast where *you* do the work to build muscle, muscle memory, and master new sounds. Each episode will focus on one or two British English sounds, looking at how they're pronounced in common words, and then practising them in some trickier phrases. Always remember that successful communication is possible in any one of the thousands of glob ...
 
Zapp! English Vocabulary and Pronunciation is based on *Real* unscripted English conversations featuring speakers with different accents. Each podcast also contains interactive audio classes with a teacher to work on your vocabulary and pronunciation. Every podcast comes with an e-book available on Zappenglish.com. The eBook includes the complete conversation and class transcripts, vocabulary lists, and additional practice exercises and answers only available in the eBooks. We charge a small ...
 
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Welcome to season 5 of English Sound Building! Today, we’re reviewing all the sounds from season 5, and many others too, with ten tongue twisters. Practise as often as you can to build muscle memory, and make sure you subscribe so you don't miss the next one. The Podcast script is available free on my Patreon. Don't forget to follow me on Instagram…
 
Join Jennifer Tarle from YouTube's Popular English Pronunciation Channel @TarleSpeech. This month, Jennifer will talk about unstressed syllables, how to make them, when to use them, and why they are important and overlooked. Unstressed syllables make you sound more natural and improves your intonation. Jennifer will also review and discuss the prev…
 
1) My favorite radio show host had a heart attack and now he’s off the air. 2) I don’t like off road vehicles. They’re bad for the environment. 3) What do baseball players do in the off season? 4) It’s better to wash your laundry during off peak hours. 5) I don’t see roast duck. Did they take it off the menu? 6) Who let that guy off his leash? 7) Y…
 
Welcome to season 5 of English Sound Building! Today, we’re looking at words with both ‘l’ and ‘r’. Practise as often as you can to build muscle memory, and make sure you subscribe so you don't miss the next one. The Podcast script is available free on my Patreon. Don't forget to follow me on Instagram. Interested in classes or a one-off diagnosis …
 
Welcome to season 5 of English Sound Building! Today, reviewing a lot of sounds in tricky clusters with /l/. Practise as often as you can to build muscle memory, and make sure you subscribe so you don't miss the next one. The Podcast script is available free on my Patreon. You can also follow and contact me on Instagram, or email learnbrickbybrick@…
 
1) He passed himself off as a doctor. 2) She’s off her rocker. [She’s crazy.] 3) If you don’t like that old table, I’ll take it off your hands. 4) The king lost his temper and shouted, “Off with his head! 5) I’m not sure, but off the top of my head I don’t think that’s a good idea. 6) Our new face cream is flying off the shelf. 7) Off the record, I…
 
Welcome to season 5 of English Sound Building! Today, we’re reviewing /r/, and a lot of other consonant sounds besides, to look at clusters with /r/. Practise as often as you can to build muscle memory, and make sure you subscribe so you don't miss the next one. The Podcast script is available free on my Patreon. Don't forget to follow me on Instag…
 
Let’s practice with short sentences using “would+like”. Note in normal speech, “I would” is shortened to “I’d”, "she would" becomes "she'd", etc. 1) I’d like to visit New York some day. 2) I’d like to eat lunch soon. 3) I’d like to learn French. 4) I’d like something to drink. 5) I’d like to be rich, but I’d settle for well-off. 6) I’d like to go h…
 
Welcome to season 5 of English Sound Building! Today, we’re practising the diphthong /eɪ/. Practise as often as you can to build muscle memory, and make sure you subscribe so you don't miss the next one. The Podcast script is available free on my Patreon. Don't forget to follow me on Instagram, Facebook or Twitter. Interested in classes? Learn with…
 
Join Jennifer Tarle from YouTube's Popular English Pronunciation Channel @TarleSpeech. This month, Jennifer will talk about the confusing Wheel of Fortune Episode where paddle boat was confused with pedal boat. On the episode, contestants confused paddle boat with pedal boat. This has been a popular topic on my How to Pronounce PEDDLE, PEDAL, PETAL…
 
Welcome to season 5 of English Sound Building! Today, we’re following on from last week, and contrasting two sounds we’ve looked at before, but not in relation to each other: /ɜ:/ and /eə/. Practise as often as you can to build muscle memory, and make sure you subscribe so you don't miss the next one. The Podcast script is available free on my Patr…
 
Welcome to season 5 of English Sound Building! Today, we’re contrasting two sounds we’ve looked at before, but not in relation to each other: /e/ and /eə/. Practise as often as you can to build muscle memory, and make sure you subscribe so you don't miss the next one. The Podcast script is available free on my Patreon. Don't forget to follow me on …
 
1) She’s always making trouble. 2) The kids are making too much noise! 3) If the baby feeds herself spaghetti, of course she’ll make a mess! 4) You made some good points, but I still don’t agree with your conclusion. 5) My right knee is bothering me again, so I’m going to call my doctor to make an appointment. 6) When someone talks a lot but their …
 
When I want to be sure I am hearing the sounds of a new language, I listen repeatedly to something short, often a single sentence. In this podcast you'll only hear a few sentences but they are repeated many times. Then you will have a chance to listen and repeat. Test yourself and see how well you can imitate my pronunciation, intonation, and rhyth…
 
Welcome to season 5 of English Sound Building! Today, we’re back with connected speech and another intrusive sound: intrusive /r/. Have fun! Practise as often as you can to build muscle memory, and make sure you subscribe so you don't miss the next one. The Podcast script is available free on my Patreon. Don't forget to follow me on Instagram, Face…
 
Follow on Telegram for more info and my Tandem class and discussion schedule. In this podcast you’ll continue practicing sentences with some of the most common irregular verbs in the present, simple past, and present perfect tenses. 1. think thought thought —She thinks she will start learning German next year. —I thought she was coming over for din…
 
Welcome to season 5 of English Sound Building! Today, we’re continuing from last week’s look at the /r/ sound, thinking about places where we see the letter ‘r’ in writing, but do not pronounce it in a standard RP accent. Practise as often as you can to build muscle memory, and make sure you subscribe so you don't miss the next one. The Podcast scr…
 
Today, Jennifer gives product updates, answers student questions, and gives tips on using stress in words. ***Please excuse the background noise which was due to workers on the day of recording. Join Jennifer Tarle from YouTube's Popular English Pronunciation Channel @TarleSpeech each month for a live discussion and podcast rebroadcast. Products, c…
 
Follow on Telegram for more info and my Tandem class and discussion schedule. Irregular verbs are a fact of life in English and many other languages. In this and the next few podcasts you’ll practice sentences with some of the most common irregular verbs in the present, simple past, and present perfect tenses. 1 say said said —She says she speaks S…
 
Let's talk about the new words added to the Merriam Webster Dictionary. Join Jennifer Tarle from YouTube's Popular English Pronunciation Channel @TarleSpeech. Jennifer will discuss the previous week's lessons and tips & tricks to be clearer and better understood. Students will have time to ask Jennifer questions about mistakes that they make when s…
 
Welcome to season 5 of English Sound Building! Today is the first of a few episodes this season looking at the /r/ sound. In particular, this episode considers words where the written letter ‘r’ is always pronounced, and practises the /r/ sound in minimal pairs with /l/ and /w/. Practise as often as you can to build muscle memory, and make sure you…
 
Follow on Telegram for more info and my Tandem class and discussion schedule. The word ‘stick’, as a noun, means a thin piece of wood that comes from a tree. So we can say, for example: 1) Find some sticks and we’ll make a fire to keep ourselves warm tonight. A stick can help someone walk. 2) Mr. Johnson is very old. He uses a walking stick when he…
 
Who’s can be a contraction of “who is” 1) Who’s your friend? [Who is your friend?] — This is Sally. 2) Who’s ready for dinner? — Everybody! We’re all hungry. 3) Who’s interested in watching a movie tonight? —I would be, but I have a lot of homework to do. 4) Kids, who’s arriving tomorrow? — Grandma and grandpa! 5) This is my daughter, Miranda, who’…
 
A common and useful construction in English combines the past continuous and the simple past tenses. Here’s an example: I was washing the dishes when my grandmother arrived. The first part of the sentence describes an action that is happening in the past and is continuing. We don’t know how long the speaker was washing dishes—maybe for ten minutes,…
 
This is a long podcast and there is no transcript. I tried to share my thoughts and feelings about how children learn language and what we adults can learn from them. Hope you find it interesting. Follow on Telegram for more info and my Tandem class and discussion schedule. All Automotive with Matt Clawson Informative automotive related topics. My …
 
One of the most common questions that new students of English will hear is: How long have you been studying English? Or: When did you start studying English? Or: When did you start learning English? So let's practice with those, because I often hear people struggle to answer those questions. Here's the question and the answer and we'll practice bot…
 
[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glottis] Follow on Telegram for more info and my Tandem class and discussion schedule. If you close your vocal cords, you stop the flow of air. In linguistics, this is called a glottal stop. Listen: Uh, oh. Uh, oh. Uh, oh. Hear the break in the sound after “Uh”? That’s a glottal stop. Repeat it with me some more and p…
 
Past tense of regular verbs: possibility no. 1. There are three “rules” or sound patterns which determine how we pronounce the past tense of regular English verbs. In this podcast, we’ll practice with the first situation, where the final SOUND of the infinitive is /t/ or /d/. For example, “accept” ends with a /t/ sound, and “guard” ends with a /d/ …
 
Use this podcast to improve your listening and pronunciation. There is no transcript. You won't need one. Listen as many times as you like, and then practice saying: She counted her money. Before you can pronounce correctly, you have to train your ears to hear the sounds as accurately as possible. Listen, listen, listen. Follow on Telegram for more…
 
The verb "to listen" is almost always followed by "to". See (and listen to) the examples below: 1) Listen to me! 2) Please listen to your father. 3) What are you listening to? 4) I’m listening to a podcast. 5) What is Sally doing? She’s listening to the news. 6) You’re a famous person so people will listen to you. 7) When I listen to Russian, I don…
 
Before vs. Until vs. While Examples: 1) Let’s go for a walk before lunch. [What should we do today?] 2) We walked until noon and then we ate lunch. 3) I cleaned the apartment before my mother arrived. 4) I cleaned the house until my mother came. 5) Call me before 11pm. 6) I waited for his call until 11pm. 7) Eat a good dinner before you have desser…
 
Welcome back to season 4 of English Sound Building! Today, we’re recapping the sounds from this season, as well as a few from others, by having fun with some tongue twisters, rhymes and a song. Practise as often as you can to build muscle memory, and make sure you subscribe so you don't miss the next one. The Podcast script is available free on my …
 
Welcome back to season 4 of English Sound Building! Today, we’re back with connected speech, this time looking at another 'intrusive' sound: /w/. Practise as often as you can to build muscle memory, and make sure you subscribe so you don't miss the next one. The Podcast script is available free on my Patreon. Don't forget to follow me on Instagram,…
 
To play something by ear has two meanings. One is the musical meaning: when you play a song by ear, it means you play the song without any sheet music, so you’re not looking at the notes. You know the song, it’s in your head, so you can play it without needing to look at written music. The second meaning of “play it by ear” means to do something wi…
 
Welcome back to season 4 of English Sound Building! Today, we’re picking back up on the /ɪ/ and /e/ sounds from last week, and seeing how they behave in two schwa diphthongs: /ɪə/ and /eə/. We’ll look at the sounds individually, in common words, and in sentences. Practise as often as you can to build muscle memory, and make sure you subscribe so yo…
 
Martha: Charles, I need some advice. C: Sure, what about? M: Yesterday I told my history professor he was an idiot. C: You’re kidding! In private, or in front of the class? M: In front of the whole class. C: I assume you’re not majoring in diplomacy or international relations? M: It’s not a joke! What should I do? C: Is he an idiot? No, never mind.…
 
Read and look up. Part One: “Read and look up” is a technique for improving your foreign language speaking and reading. It is easy to do. Here is how. 1) First, choose a text. It’s okay if the text contains a few new vocabulary words, but not so many that you can’t understand the overall meaning. 2) If possible, print the text so you can mark on it…
 
Welcome back to season 4 of English Sound Building! This week we're revisiting two short vowels we've looked at before: /e/ and /ɪ/, and contrasting them with each other. Practise as often as you can to build muscle memory, and make sure you subscribe so you don't miss the next one. The Podcast script is available free on my Patreon. Don't forget t…
 
Here are some ways to say that you agree with another speaker. 1) I agree completely. 2) You are correct. (Or) You are absolutely correct. 3) Exactly. (Or) Absolutely. 4) That’s so true. (Or) What you just said is so true. 5) You’re right. 6) You took the words right out of my mouth. [You said what I was going to say.] 7) That’s exactly how I feel.…
 
This dictation is three paragraphs long. It is repeated three times. Instructions: Step One: Listen to the paragraphs as many times as you like. The more you listen, the easier it will be to write down each sentence. Step Two: Listen again, but stop after each sentence and try to repeat it to yourself. If you can repeat it, go ahead and write it do…
 
Welcome back to season 4 of English Sound Building! Today, we're looking at "syncope" in pronunciation: otherwise known as words with disappearing syllables. Practise as often as you can to build muscle memory, and make sure you subscribe so you don't miss the next one. The Podcast script is available free on my Patreon. Don't forget to follow me o…
 
13) There are some guys on Tandem who are only trying to pick up girls. [meet, bring home for sex] 14) He was picked up by the police. They questioned him for hours. [found and taken to the police station] 15) Marion picked up some food on her way home. [got some food] 16) My mother is a great cook. Everything I know about cooking I picked up from …
 
Some practice with the phrasal verb “to pick up”. 1) I need to move this table. Can you help me pick it up? [lift] 2) I’ll pick you up tomorrow morning at 8 and we can drive to work together. [give a ride] 3) The baby started crying so her mother picked her up. [lifted] 4) My father used to have a shortwave radio. Before the internet, he could alwa…
 
Be careful with the pronunciation of “th”: the tip of your tongue is between your teeth. It helps to watch videos to see how people make the "th" sound. Here's one video on YouTube, and here is another one. 1. Thank you for helping me. 2. Thank you for helping us. 3. Thank you for helping me with my homework. 4. Thank you for helping me make dinner…
 
Welcome back to season 4 of English Sound Building! Today, we're looking at word stress in two-syllable nouns and verbs. Practise as often as you can to build muscle memory, and make sure you subscribe so you don't miss the next one. The Podcast script is available free on my Patreon. Don't forget to follow me on Instagram, Facebook or Twitter. Int…
 
Welcome back to season 4 of English Sound Building! Today, we're picking back up on /b/ from last week, but contrasting it with the fricative /v/. We’ll look at the sounds individually, in common words, and in sentences. Practise as often as you can to build muscle memory, and make sure you subscribe so you don't miss the next one. The Podcast scri…
 
Welcome back to season 4 of English Sound Building! Today, we're looking at our last voiceless/ voiced consonant pair: /p/ and /b/. We’ll look at the sounds individually, in common words, and in sentences. Practise as often as you can to build muscle memory, and make sure you subscribe so you don't miss the next one. The Podcast script is available…
 
Here are some more sentences with 4 syllable words. 1. The teacher demonstrated how to use a dictionary. 2. I need more information about the new machinery. 3. Covid 19 is an example of evolution in real-time. 4. Charlie sent me his letter of resignation. 5. The politician spoke about capitalism. 6. I appreciate your observations. 7. The security s…
 
Note: Unaccented syllables in English are normally pronounced with the infamous "Schwa" sound. Using the phonetic alphabet, this sound is written /ə/. The word "banana" would be written /bənænə/ with the stress or accent on the second syllable. Languages like Spanish keep vowel pronunciation the same whether syllables are stressed or not. Ask a nat…
 
Welcome back to season 4 of English Sound Building! Following on from last week's episode all about /h/, this week we're discussing when /h/ is dropped - both by most speakers, in the weak forms of grammar words, and by some speakers, much more often, in some regional English accents. Practise as often as you can to build muscle memory, and make su…
 
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