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Music of the Jews and their neighbors from all around the world performed live in Moscow and Jerusalem - from folk and liturgical hymns to classical and klezmer punk. Музыка евреев и их соседей со всего мира в живом исполнении - от фолка до классики, от синагогальных песнопений до клезмер-панка.
 
Комитас Вардапет (1869 - 1935)... Ярчайший представитель армянского музыкального искусства, бессмертный творец, с именем которого связана целая эпоха в истории армянской музыки. Композитор, этнограф, фольклорист, музыковед, певец, хормейстр, флейтист, педагог: плодовитым было его творчество. Комитас – основоположник национальной композиторской школы. Он очистил армянскую музыку от чужеродных элементов и доказал всему миру, что у армян есть своя самобытная музыка. Будучи большим знатоком армя ...
 
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show series
 
How a synagogue cantor (chazzan) can avoid turning prayer into operetta? In the latest episode of Radio Eshkolot podcast Gregory Yakerson, the cantor of St. Petersburg Synagogue, reveals the secrets of his art. Download the episode Detailed description Как избежать превращения молитвы в оперетту? В новом выпуске подкаста Radio Eshkolot кантор (певч…
 
Why do Hasidic Jews believe that you can hear Polish and Ukrainian peasants inadvertently speaking Hebrew and Yiddish? In the new episode of Radio Eshkolot podcast musicologist Hava Shmulevich and musician Ilya Saitanov continue the discussion of "macaronic" language of Jewish songs (see the first episode here). Download the episode Detailed descri…
 
In the new episode of Radio Eshkolot podcast musical critic Alexey Munipov introduces "Bukovina songs" by contemporary composer Leonid Desyatnikov, performed by pianist Pavel Dombrovsky. Inspired by Bukovina – a very unusual "contact zone" between Ukrainian, German, Jewish, Polish and Romanian cultures – Desyatnikov's preludes reflect his childhood…
 
Why do Hasidic Jews (whose native language was Yiddish, and sacred language of prayer and learning – Hebrew) chose to sing some of their most sacred songs in a Slavic dialect? In the new episode of Radio Eshkolot podcast, musicologist Hava Shmulevich and musician Ilya Saitanov discuss the "macaronism" (mixture of languages) in traditional Jewish so…
 
In the latest episode of Radio Eshkolot podacst the Berlin-based contemporary composer Boris Filanovsky conducts a "creative listening" workshop on the slow part of Beethoven's "Ghost Trio" (op.70), performed specially for the workshop by Contemporary Music Company in Peredelkino Creative Space (Moscow). Download the episode Detailed description В …
 
In the new episode of Radio Eshkolot podcast musician Ilya Saitanov ("Lakocha") tries to unravel a bundle of questions and enigmas around the musical permutations of Itzik Manger's poem "Du vest geyn mitn barg". Download the episode Detailed description В новом выпуске подкаста Radio Eshkolot музыкант Илья Сайтанов («Лакоча») пытается распутать клу…
 
Recently New York-based musician Zisl Slepovitch delivered a series of talks on Jewish music of Belarus (bit.ly/2HQA3ms) and together with Ilya Saitanov curated a thematic playlist of rare sound recordings (bit.ly/33wlZpT). In the new episode of Radio Eshkolot podcast ZIsl Slepovitch gives you the answer to the essential question – How one can disc…
 
This playlist curated by the New York-based musician and musicologist Zisl Slepovitch and Ilya Saitanov (Lakocha) is a prelude to the next episode, which will be devoted to the Jewish music of Belarus. Rare recordings of secular and religious music were mostly made in the field by ethnomusicologists Zinoviy (Susman) Kiselgof, Sofia Magid, Yakov Maz…
 
Meet KGB archives, exclusive interviews and rare recordings in the second and final part of Mitia Khramtsov's and Ilya Saitanov's story of the Soviet Jewish restaurant musicians ("labukhs). You are advised to start listening from the first part, accompanied by the annotated playlist. Download the episode Detailed description Архивы КГБ, эксклюзивны…
 
As a sequel to their podcast on Jewish music in the Soviet restaurant musicians Mitia Kharmtsov (Dobranoch) and Ilya Saitanov (Lakocha) offer a curated and annotated playlist of top-10 archival recordings of Jewish "labukh" musicians. Download the episode Detailed description В продолжение своего подкаста о еврейской музыке в советском ресторане му…
 
Recently opened KGB archives in Ukraine give us a rare glimpse into the Jewish music of the Soviet restaurants – a scene relentlessly thriving in 1970s and 1980s despite persecution. In the new episode of Radio Eshkolot podcast musicians Mitia Khramtsov (Dobranoch) and Ilya Saitanov (Lakocha) take us on a journey based on interviews with old labukh…
 
Why do Mountain Jews of the Caucasus pronounce Hebrew a lot like Yemenites? How does music demonstrate that Mountain Jews came to the Caucasus from Iran? Why do Mountain Jews and Muslims speak the same juhuri language but don't share even one folk song? How does music from Dagestan influence the soundscape of modern Israel? In the new episode of Ra…
 
Why did the keeper of Berditchev synagogue polish the magnificent chandelier on Sabbath eve and hang himself on it? In the new episode of Radio Eshkolot podcast the actress Julia Aug tells a Hasidic story about withering fire, freezing water, generous princes, wise centenarians, and dangerous ideas. Commentary: Uri Gershovich. Soundtrack: Alex Nadz…
 
How does Kazachok transform Hungarian string instruments into percussion? Where does it arrive in the course of its Odyssey around Greek islands? What did American klezmer musicians do to it? In the new episode of Radio Eshkolot podcast, Ilya Saitanov continues his adventurous ethnomusicological journey (for the beginning, see the first part). Down…
 
Is Kazachok a melody or a dance? Is Ukranian gopak the same as Ukranian kozachok? And what about Jewish hopke and kozatske? When do Lubavitch hasidim dance Kazachok? All these questions are subjects of endless debate. In the new episode of Radio Eshkolot podcast, musician and folklorist Ilya Saitanov in dialogue with his colleague from Ukraine Ilya…
 
How did the blind Rabbi from Aleppo turn a popular Egyptian song into a Messianic hymn? How did the melody of a blind Iraqi Sufi get to be played by an Israeli musician as an opening for Radiohead? Why do synagogues in Jerusalem recite Kaddish to the melody of an Umm Kulthum song? The new episode of Radio Eshkolot podcast is about a quaint relation…
 
"Sleep, sleep, my girl, sleep, sleep, my dear. Daddy will bring you a birdie, so that your eye won't hurt". Why is father always away? How does the bird cure the eye? Why is the singer lisping? What do Yakut songs have in common with a Jewish lullaby? The "slow listening" of a simple Yiddish lullaby with a musician Ilya Saitanov and a philologist A…
 
One night in November 2019 groups of flâneurs went walking in Berlin. Their impressions were captured in flows of images, audio notes, videos, stories, and a musical piece. Drifters created situations where the once-familiar city became defamiliarized – "Berlin is never Berlin". Composer Alex Nadzharov montaged the Drift sounds into the psychogeogr…
 
"You should drink a little vodka, but like a Mensch, not like a Golem" – this line from a Yiddish song incorporates the whole philosophy of Jewish drinking. In the new episode of Radio Eshkolot podcast musician and folklorist Ilya Saitanov and linguist Alexandra Polyan present the adventurous story of the lyrics and music of the song Az me nemt a b…
 
"Slow reading is the opposite of close reading and yes I do think that Jewish reading practices can teach us a lot about this kind of reading and that reading is always a call, it's always a call to respond. Only after silent reading is invented does reading become a kind of practice literally and figuratively of masturbation". In the latest episod…
 
Did you know that "Oyfn pripetchek brent a fayerel" (“On the hearth, a fire burns”) is actually a metaphor for female desire? The story told by Israeli musicologist Michael Lukin begins with rabbinic condemnation of Jewish women singing "whore songs" in early modern Europe and continues with one of such songs becoming a source for the most famous Y…
 
Why Jewish "folk songs" were "invented" in the 19th century? Does it mean the Jews did not sing outside the synagogue before? And if they did, then when and where? How do raisins and almonds appear in the most popular Ashkenazi lullaby? How can a roof tile turn into a goat? Israeli musicologist Michael Lukin talks about the famous "Rozhinkes mit ma…
 
Ancient Hebrew devotional songs – tehillim (ψαλμοί, Psalms)– have reached us only as written texts. However, for thousands of years they have endlessly inspired composers to recreate the vanished music. This episode of Radio Eshkolot podcast presents daring attempts at writing a "soundtrack" to Psalms – from French Renaissance to New York avant-gar…
 
Ten most viewed musical videos on Eshkolot Youtube channel have one apparent common feature – they provoke violent battles over cultural appropriation in the commentaries. "Jewish Csárdás" – How dare you? This is our Hungarian music! "Jewish Maqam" – Jewish?? Are you kidding me? This is pure Azeri mugam! "Polka żydówka" – What a chutzpah! It seems …
 
"Niggun, a Hasidic song without words, is like a very powerful virus. Because the moment you hear it – you have to catch it. If you have to sit there thinking about it, it doesn't work. The niggunim work by having a structure, which you can learn very quickly, if you just try to sing it" – explains American musician and philosopher Alan Bern on Rad…
 
A hundred years ago Weimar Berlin became a global migration hub, a multilingual marketplace, exploding with artistic, technological and social innovation amidst economic crises and decadent nightlife. The latter was dominated by cabaret and dance-hall music created by Jewish composers Mischa Spoliansky and Friedrich Hollaender. In the new podcast R…
 
Fortuna Records is a Tel Aviv label famous for its discovery and re-issue of rare and forgotten recordings of Middle Eastern folk and pop music of the 1970s – from Egyptian classics to Palestinian folk, from Greek-Israeli rock to Turkish funk. Fortuna Records DJs unveil hidden soundscapes on the radio and at wild thematic parties in clubs of Tel Av…
 
Haim Louk was born in Casablanca (the same year as the movie) and for many decades he has performed songs embodying the wandering of Jewish music from Gibraltar to Bosporus. His tunes reflect the rich diversity of musical traditions of Muslim Mediterranean, merging Berber, Hebrew and Arabic influences. Rabbi Haim Louk sings mystical texts from Anda…
 
Yiddish skomorokh-trickster, vagrant philologist, Grammy nominee Psoy Korolenko is a unique example of living Jewish counter-culture – culture of shameless appropriation, burlesque multilingualism, carnivalesque obscenity and translation against all rules. Radio Eshkolot has collected its best recordings of Psoy's live performances – from rap-niggu…
 
Igor Krutogolov's Toy Orchestra is an Israeli band which uses children toys instead of "real" instruments. Its music and musicians are highly professional, so that plastic cow-mooing piano, toddler's drums, disposable clarinets and rubber pigs can magically play sophisticated folk, rock and heavy metal compositions. In the fall podcast Radio Eshkol…
 
Alcoholism is the distinction and privilege of being human (Leon Trotsky) In spite of a common misconception that "Jews don't drink as much as others", often combined with an anti-Semitic libel that "Jews profit from inebriating the common folk", Jewish spirituality is deeply associated with distilled spirits. There is no better demonstration of th…
 
"Maqams are like windows into other dimensions. You have twelve windows that take you to twelve absolutely different worlds. The secret teaching of Maqam was not shared with just anyone. It was to be received either from one's father or a teacher. And to be accepted by the teacher, one had to have a personal relationship with him, like a guru or ma…
 
Each text conceals sound - breath, rhythm, intonation. Sounding poetry, prose and philosophy become an embodied experience. In the fifth episode of Radio Eshkolot podcast musicians present live "soundtracks" to medieval and contemporary texts. Download the entire episode Detailed description В любом тексте сокрыт звук - дыхание, ритм, интонация. Зв…
 
"Sometimes, when people are happy and dance, they grab someone standing outside the circle who is depressed and gloomy. Against his will they bring him into the circle of dancers; against his will, they force him to be happy along with them. It is the same with happiness. When a person is happy, gloom and suffering stand aside. Yet greater still is…
 
During the revelation at Mount Sinai all those present experienced a strange sensation of "seeing the sounds" (ro'im et ha-kolot, Exodus 20:14). For many contemporary composers creating a soundscape or soundspace, which should be navigated with eyes wide shut, became a foundation of their musical philosophy. Please be warned that the third episode …
 
Some Orthodox Jews do not listen to women's singing because of the Talmudic dictum "kol be-isha erva" (Kiddushin 70a), usually translated as "A woman's voice is nakedness". Many Eshkolot musical events included astonishingly beautiful women's voices, because we believe this saying to mean "A woman's voice is exposure" and revelation of her innermos…
 
The main reason why Jewish culture is so cool is its global and multilingual character. The first episode of Radio Eshkolot podcast includes songs in 14(!) languages performed live for Eshkolot Project in Moscow and Jerusalem for the last 10 years. Download the entire episode: http://files.eshkolot.ru/mixtape1.mp3 Detailed description. Главная "фиш…
 
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