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The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (JBJS) provides a monthly podcast and vodcast to bring you highlights of the latest print and electronic content. JBJS has been the most valued source of information for orthopaedic surgeons and researchers for over 100 years and is the gold standard in peer-reviewed scientific information in the field.
 
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Get behind the scenes with the journalists reporting for the Express-News. Each week, host Luis Vazquez interviews a reporter for an in-depth account of a popular series or an exclusive story that has everyone talking.
 
15 Minute History is a history podcast designed for historians, enthusiasts, and newbies alike. This is a joint project of Hemispheres, the international outreach consortium at the University of Texas at Austin, and Not Even Past, a website with articles on a wide variety of historical issues, produced by the History Department at the University of Texas at Austin. This podcast series is devoted to short, accessible discussions of important topics in world history, United States history, and ...
 
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We're in the midst of long-term national conversation about policing, crime, race and justice, and we wanted to hear what a career member of the policing establishment thought about it. On today's show, Bill Bratton, former New York City police commissioner and the author (with Peter Knobler) of The Profession: A Memoir of Community, Race, and the …
 
This week, Olympic gymnast Simone Biles said that she wasn't in the right headspace to compete. So what happens when trailblazers, those known for breaking glass ceilings, need a minute? On today's show, Candace Buckner, reporter focusing on the intersection of race, gender and diversity issues in the world of sports for The Washington Post, breaks…
 
As Congress begins hearings into the Jan. 6 assault on the Capitol, the question of whom to hold accountable is front and center. What did we hear at the hearing, and what does it mean? On today's show, Washington Post congressional reporter Jacqueline Alemany and national security and law enforcement reporter Devlin Barrett, breaks down the first …
 
The CDC just rolled back its guidance that vaccinated people could safely go maskless indoors. COVID breakthrough infections are becoming more common as the Delta variant spreads quickly. So how should people be thinking about public health and risk management these days? On today's show, Dara Kass, MD, emergency medicine physician at the Columbia …
 
Tomorrow, a congressional panel will convene to begin hearings into the Jan. 6 insurrection. What should we expect from the hearings, and just how bi-partisan is this effort? On today's show, Mara Liasson, national political correspondent for NPR, ticks through the biggest political stories from over the weekend and what to watch for in the coming …
 
This year, we've seen flooding on the east coast, wildfires on the west coast, and a late-winter snow storms in Texas that knocked out the power grid. So what's up with the weather? On today's show, Adam Sobel, professor at Columbia University, director of Columbia's Initiative on Extreme Weather and Climate, host of the podcast "Deep Convection" a…
 
This podcast covers the JBJS July 21, 2021 issue. Featured are articles covering A Novel Genetic Marker for Risk of Degenerative Rotator Cuff Disease Surgery in the UK Biobank; recorded commentary by Dr. van Wijnen; Results of the First US FDA-Approved Hip Resurfacing Device at 10-Year Follow-up.The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery
 
We've learned a lot more about Trump's insurrection in the months since it happened. But we didn't know how far his military advisors went to avoid a constitutional crisis. On today's show, The Washington Post's White House senior Washington correspondent Philip Rucker and national investigative reporter Carol Leonnig, authors of I Alone Can Fix It…
 
At some point after the election, AG Barr reversed course on Trump's 'Big Lie.' But how did his actions before the election enable the former president's behavior? On today's show, Elie Honig, CNN senior legal analyst and author of Hatchet Man: How Bill Barr Broke the Prosecutor's Code and Corrupted the Justice Department (HarperCollins, 2021) talk…
 
The anti-government protests in Cuba are sparking debates here in the US about the embargo and our icy diplomatic relationship with the island. How are Cuban-Americans thinking about it? Today, Dr. Andy S. Gomez, Retired Director of the Institute for Cuban and Cuban-American Studies and former Assistant Provost and Dean of International Studies of …
 
In the 1600s, Britain used Jamaica as a hub of the transatlantic slave trade. Now, the Caribbean nation is taking steps to demand restitution. On today's show, Selwyn R. Cudjoe, professor of Africana Studies at Wellesley College and an expert in Caribbean literature and Caribbean intellectual history, discusses the reports that Jamaica plans to pet…
 
Expanded child tax credits are expected to hit peoples' bank accounts in the next few weeks. So who's getting one, and what does the government hope the money gets spent on? On today's show, Michelle Singletary, personal finance columnist for The Washington Post and author of the new book What To Do With Your Money When Crisis Hits, breaks down wha…
 
Some Democratic legislators in Texas have fled the state in an attempt to prevent sweeping changes to election law that would make it harder to vote. On today's show, Ari Berman, senior reporter at Mother Jones covering voting rights and author of Give Us the Ballot: The Modern Struggle for Voting Rights in America, recaps President Biden's major s…
 
Twenty-three former members of Colombia's military have been arrested as suspects in the assassination of Haiti's president, including one with former ties to U.S. law enforcement. On Today's Show, Catherine Porter, Toronto Bureau Chief for the New York Times and and author of the memoir A Girl Named Lovely (Simon & Schuster, 2019) about her experi…
 
We check in on the Biden Administration. In particular, its missed vaccine benchmark, and a timeline for Afghan troop withdrawal. On today's show, Jonathan Lemire, White House reporter for the Associated Press and political analyst for MSNBC/NBC News, discusses the latest national political developments, including the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanist…
 
This podcast covers the JBJS July 7, 2021 issue. Featured are articles covering Lower Complication Risk for Children with Septic Arthritis without Contiguous Osteomyelitis; recorded commentary by Dr. Lovejoy; Minimally Invasive Stabilization with or without Ablation for Metastatic Periacetabular Tumors.…
 
Gun violence is a tragic, complicated and confounding problem. What does the research say about why young men in particular pick up firearms. On today's show, Rachel Swaner, research director at the Center for Court Innovation; Elise White, deputy research director at the Center for Court Innovation; and Basaime Spate, community-based research coor…
 
Over the weekend, Biden celebrated his first 4th of July as President. We look at his remarks on the occasion, and how his version of patriotism compares to his predecessor. On today's show, Yamiche Alcindor, White House correspondent for the PBS NewsHour and moderator of Washington Week, and a political contributor to NBC News and MSNBC, discusses…
 
Justin Vine delayed going to the hospital for as long as he could because he had no insurance. He endured weeks on a ventilator, a two-month coma, vivid hallucinations and the fear of what it all might cost him. Reporter Lauren Caruba and photographer Lisa Krantz talk about the year they spent covering Justin's story. Read more: COVID nearly killed…
 
The Supreme Court issued its final opinions of the term, including a ruling that Arizona's legislature can make it harder to cast early votes. On today's show, Jami Floyd, senior editor for race and justice and legal editor at WNYC, offers her analysis of the 6-3 opinion by Justice Alito (and a strong dissent from Justice Kagan) upholding Arizona's…
 
On the last day of Pride Month, we spotlight some reporting and analysis of how some companies mask anti-LGBT behaviors behind rainbow branding. On today's show, Zach Stafford, MSNBC contributor, the former editor-at-large of BuzzFeed and the first Black editor-in-chief of The Advocate, the oldest and largest LGBT publication in the United States, …
 
There's a debate in public health about whether vaccine policy should target American children, or adults globally. On today's show, Dr. Leana Wen, emergency physician, professor at George Washington University, contributing columnist for The Washington Post, CNN medical analyst, former Baltimore Health Commissioner and the author of the forthcomin…
 
Two matters of law — a voting rights case in Georgia and an indictment of officials in the Trump Organization — have moved forward in recent days. On today's show, Aziz Huq, professor of law at the University of Chicago School of Law, explains the legal underpinnings behind these two cases, how the parties might proceed.…
 
If you've been noticing long lines at the store, it's probably not capacity requirements anymore. Instead, look at why so many workers are leaving retail. On today's show, Anna North, senior correspondent at Vox and author of the bestselling book Outlawed (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2021), joins to take calls from listeners on how this exodus is affect…
 
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