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Medievalíssimo

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Medievalíssimo

Podcasts Clio

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Sejam todos e todas bem-vindos ao Medievalíssimo, o seu podcast de história e historiografia medieval! Temos como missão produzir história medieval pública, se afastando de todo misticismos, apologias e preconceitos em relação ao período. Contato: medivalissimo@gmail.com Siga o Medievalíssimo no Instagram no @medievalissimo
 
Join your hosts as they discuss the highs and lows of medieval living history and re-enactment. Through their personal experiences, and with a help from expert guests and friends, they walk you through lessons learned in the hobby and set you on the right path to success.
 
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Gone Medieval

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Gone Medieval

History Hit

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From long-lost Viking ships to kings buried in unexpected places; from murders and power politics, to myths, religion, the lives of ordinary people: Gone Medieval is History Hit’s podcast dedicated to the middle ages, in Europe and far beyond. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
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MedievalPod

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MedievalPod

Emily Price

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Medieval Pod is a podcast focused on conversations with medievalists, scholars, and enthusiasts about themes related to medieval culture that can be seen in our modern life. This podcast and its accompanying website are a resource for anyone who wants to learn more about the medieval period, from some of the most exciting new voices in medieval studies and related fields.
 
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The Medieval World

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The Medieval World

W.J.B. Mattingly

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Welcome to The Medieval World Podcast, where we explore fun and interesting pieces of medieval history. Each Friday, I publish a new episode. In addition to episodes, check out my lectures below. If there's an episode or series you would like to see, let me know via email at themedievalworldpodcast@gmail.com. Also, you can follow me on twitter at: https://twitter.com/wjb_mattingly . I am also starting to create videos of my lectures at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxmN86fC3uYC9JW-hKV4Z1w.
 
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Medieval Warfare podcast

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Medieval Warfare podcast

The History Network

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A history podcast about the Middle Ages and warfare during those times. From knights to Vikings, crusaders to kings, we will explore the medieval world and its military history. Hosted by the editor of Medieval Warfare magazine, this podcast features guests discussing various topics about warfare, including battles, sieges, weapons, military organization, chivalry and more. We will have conversations with the leading historians and archaeologists in the field, who can tell us about the lates ...
 
Open the doors to medieval history! Discussions on history of the medieval period of the world, specifically Europe and Scandinavia. Hosted by Wendy Jordan, MPhil (Master's) in archeology from Cambridge University (UK) and BA in history from the University of Oklahoma. Produced by RDG Communications. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/randy-gibson8/support
 
Enter the world of Cartanin, a land embroiled in conflict, revenge, and war. An unprecedented tragedy throws a new and unlikely king into power, a princess is forced to choose between love and loyalty, and a young girl finds herself in the midst of the enemy.Cartanin: a weekly audio drama podcast which brings you into a unique medieval fantasy world every week.
 
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All things must end. This final special episode on the Wars of the Roses deals with a series of endings and considers what finding a date for the end of the conflict means for how we think about this critical period. Lancaster will be revived, only to meet a final end. The House of York seems secure, but would fall, replaced by an unknown Welshman …
 
Hello and welcome to Medieval Murder, the podcast that brings all things gruesome and historical to the comfort of your own home or car or wherever it is you’re listening from. My name is Hannah Purtymun and I’m here with my father Kevin Purtymun to discuss some of the most famous and infamous murders that took place in the Medieval and Early Moder…
 
Elizabeth Oyler and Katherine Saltzman-Li's book Cultural Imprints: War and Memory in the Samurai Age (Cornell UP, 2022) draws on literary works, artifacts, performing arts, and documents that were created by or about the samurai to examine individual "imprints," traces holding specifically grounded historical meanings that persist through time. Th…
 
We finish off our Medieval True Crime miniseries with a look at two hangings from the year 1484 and explore some of the practices surrounding and meanings of hanging as a mode of execution in medieval Europe. Today's Text Knox, Ronald, and Shane Leslie, editors and translators. The Miracles of King Henry VI. Cambridge UP, 1923. References Merback, …
 
This week, Danièle and Peter Konieczny report back on the 57th International Congress on Medieval Studies, affectionately known this year as "Kalamazoom". Here are some favourite papers, some of the exciting new research going on in medieval studies and how the field is changing for the better.Medievalists.net
 
Sarah and guest Miti von Weissenberg explore sanctity and voluntary poverty in 1989 film Francesco! Join us as we delve into the real lives of St. Francis and St. Clare of Assisi, the intertwined histories of the Franciscans and the Poor Clares, and the link between biopic and hagiography. Learn more about Miti’s research and teaching: https://www.…
 
Would you have sex with a troll woman? This episode is the second instalment of a two-part series on sex and gender in medieval sagas. Lucie talks with Matthew Roby, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Toronto, who deciphers for us the dirty details of these Old Norse and Icelandic texts. Turns out there are a lot of them, and many include m…
 
We continue the Abd al-Latif series and dig into his observations on Egypt. If you like what you hear and want to chip in to support the podcast, my Patreon is here. I'm on Twitter @circus_human, Instagram @humancircuspod, and I have some things on Redbubble. Sources: Abd al-Laṭīf al-Baghdādī. A Physician on the Nile: A Description of Egypt and Jou…
 
Emma Natalya Stein's book Constructing Kanchi: City of Infinite Temples (Amsterdam UP, 2021) traces the emergence of the South Indian city of Kanchi as a major royal capital and multireligious pilgrimage destination during the era of the Pallava and Chola dynasties (circa seventh through thirteenth centuries). It presents the first-ever comprehensi…
 
Early medieval royals ate mostly meat, right? Wrong! A new study that’s made headlines around the world has shown that medieval kings were largely vegetarian! To help shed light on this exciting new discovery, today Cat is joined by Dr Sam Leggett of the University of Edinburgh, a bio-archaeologist and the lead author of the study. For more Gone Me…
 
To many the city might seem simply a large urban area to live within, but it actually forms an important political concept and community that has been influential throughout European history. From the polis of Ancient Greece, to the Roman Republic, to the city-states of the Italian Renaissance, and down to the present day. Modern concepts of democr…
 
Part one of this comprehensive trilogy covering the Wars of the Roses left the Yorkist lords attained and in exile. From this point, the 15th century civil wars were transformed into a bitter procession of dynastic clashes between the rival houses of Lancaster and York - the result of which would reforge England's destiny for centuries to come. In …
 
Analyzing the spread and survival of Islamic legal ideas and commentaries in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Indian Ocean littorals, Islamic Law in Circulation: Shafi'i Texts across the Indian Ocean and the Mediterranean (Cambridge University Press, 2022) focuses on Shāfiʿīsm, one of the four Sunnī schools of Islamic law. It explores how certain …
 
Margery Kempe: mystic, autobiographer…schizophrenic? In honour of Mental Health Awareness week, Dr Cat Jarman is joined by Dr Alison Torn from Leeds Trinity University to explore the complicated legacy of a woman who is credited as both the first English autobiographer, and case of schizophrenia. However, how appropriate is it to view Kempe’s life …
 
The Wars of the Roses is a complex and fascinating period of English history that dominates the second half of the 15th century and leads to the rise of the Tudor dynasty. It’s often characterised as a dynastic struggle between Lancaster and York, but it was much more than that. In this first part of three special episodes, Matt Lewis details the o…
 
Material goods are a rich and fascinating source for finding out more about the ordinary lives of the people of the Middle Ages. This week, Danièle speaks with Katherine French about what Londoners’ homes were like both before and after the Black Death, what they filled them with, and how we know. Sign up for Danièle Cybulskie's Medieval Masterclas…
 
A Bowl for a Coin: A Commodity History of Japanese Tea (U Hawaii Press, 2019) is the first book in any language to describe and analyze the history of all Japanese teas from the plant’s introduction to the archipelago around 750 to the present day. To understand the triumph of the tea plant in Japan, William Wayne Farris begins with its cultivation…
 
In Norse mythology, the Valkyries determine who lived and who died on the battlefield. Translated as “Chooser of the Fallen” in Old Norse, they’re often depicted as supernatural women who guide the souls of deceased soldiers worthy enough of a place in Valhalla, to feast with the god Odin. Today, Dr Cat Jarman is joined by Dr Jóhanna Katrín Friðrik…
 
Old English is the language you think you know until you actually hear or see it. Unlike Shakespearean English or even Chaucer’s Middle English, Old English—the language of Beowulf—defies comprehension by untrained modern readers. Used throughout much of Britain more than a thousand years ago, it is rich with words that haven’t changed (like word),…
 
Sarah and guest Sara McDougall take on another of 2021’s highly anticipated medieval-inspired films: The Last Duel. Join us as we get into the myths and realities about medieval law and this fascinating 1386 trial, and our … struggles … with this film.TRIGGER WARNING: The film includes graphic depictions of sexual assault, which we critique in dept…
 
In today’s Gone Medieval podcast, Matt Lewis joins Dallas Campbell - host of our sister podcast Patented: History of Inventions - to explore the role of medieval monks in inventing. Seeing scientific and philosophical investigation as a way to get closer to God - despite the threat of being labelled a heretic - monks were considered masters of inve…
 
Histories of India usually concern themselves with events and invasions in the subcontinent’s North, while the rest of India’s rich story is often reduced down to little more than dry footnotes. Now historian and Indian history podcast presenter Anirudh Kanisetti has brought to light the early medieval period in the Deccan Plateau - between the Ara…
 
Did you know that Loki was a gender-bending God? In this episode of the Medieval Grad Podcast, Lucie Laumonier interviews Matthew Roby, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Toronto. Matthew’s research looks at sex and gender in Old Norse and Icelandic sagas. There were many gender-bending characters in these texts, informing us of the gender …
 
The term “Middle Ages” is commonly used but really only applies to a Western European view of history. It was created at the beginning of the Early Modern period in England to categorise what had gone before. The acclaimed historian Peter Frankopan is widening the geographic focus to understand the period in world history as a whole, and counter a …
 
In The Invention of Norman Visual Culture: Art, Politics, and Dynastic Ambition (Cambridge UP, 2020), Lisa Reilly establishes a new interpretive paradigm for the eleventh and twelfth-century art and architecture of the Norman world in France, England, and Sicily. Traditionally, scholars have considered iconic works like the Cappella Palatina and th…
 
The Northman now showing in UK cinemas is an action-filled epic that follows a young Viking prince on his quest to avenge his father's murder. Its director Robert Eggers has described it as the “most accurate Viking movie ever made." But what does "accuracy" mean for a historical blockbuster? And how is it achieved? In this episode of Gone Medieval…
 
Ibn Babawayh – also known as al-Shaykh al-Saduq – was a prominent Twelver Shi'i scholar of hadith. Writing within the first century after the vanishing of the twelfth imam, al-Saduq represents a pivotal moment in Twelver hadith literature, as this Shi'i community adjusted to a world without a visible imam and guide, a world wherein the imams could …
 
Finally, Media-eval tackles perhaps the most central text of medieval-inspired fantasy: The Lord of the Rings. Join Sarah and fellow medieval historian Paul Freedman, for a wide-ranging discussion about medievalism, food, gender, race, and more in the books and films.Learn more about Paul and his work: https://history.yale.edu/people/paul-freedman …
 
Easter today is marked by chocolate eggs and two Bank Holidays - in the Medieval world it had a deeply spiritual significance. But it wasn’t without its share of celebration and merrymaking too. In this episode, Matt Lewis explains the origins of many Easter traditions in the Medieval period, and how our ancestors knew how to fuse together religiou…
 
In 1386, Marguerite de Carrouges accused Jacques le Gris of having raped her, and though the French Parliament could not come to an agreement as to whether or not le Gris was guilty, we know that he was, because Marguerite's husband Jean killed le Gris in a trial by combat, so that's settled. Although le Gris' descendants would keep trying to convi…
 
Cambodia is home to Angkor, one of the most important archaeological sites of Southeast Asia. Greater Angkor, the capital of the Khmer Empire, was a low-density city covered about a 1000 sq km and was the home of between 750,000 to 900,000 people in the 12th century CE. The urban complex was largely abandoned in the 14th and 15th centuries. Its cen…
 
The biblical commentaries known as Miqra’ot Gedolot have inspired and educated generations of Hebrew readers. Now, with the five volumes of the acclaimed English edition of Miqra’ot Gedolot, The Commentators' Bible—Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy—the voices of Rashi, Ibn Ezra, Nachmanides, Rashbam, Abarbanel, Kimhi, and other medie…
 
Today we talk to Sigurður Gylfi Magnússon about Wasteland with Words (Reaktion, 2010) and about microhistory as a method. Iceland is an enigmatic island country marked by contradiction: it’s a part of Europe, yet separated from it by the Atlantic Ocean; it’s seemingly inhospitable, yet home to more than 300,000. Wasteland with Words explores these …
 
The story of the “conflict thesis” between science and religion—the notion of perennial conflict or warfare between the two—is part of our modern self-understanding. As the story goes, John William Draper (1811–1882) and Andrew Dickson White (1832–1918) constructed dramatic narratives in the nineteenth century that cast religion as the relentless e…
 
Many readers know Lewis as an author of fiction and fantasy literature, including the Chronicles of Narnia and the Space Trilogy. Others know him for his books in apologetics, including Mere Christianity and The Problem of Pain. But few know him for his scholarly work as a professor of medieval and Renaissance literature. What shaped the mind of th…
 
Paul Moses, former Newsday city editor and senior religion writer, is a professor of journalism at Brooklyn College and the City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism. He was the lead writer on a Newsday team that won the Pulitzer Prize. He is the author of The Saint the Sultan (2009, Doubleday) and An Unlikely Union: The Love-Hate S…
 
Little has been known up until now about the involvement and power of women during the Crusader period. When Saladin's armies besieged Jerusalem in 1187, behind the city walls a last-ditch defense was being led by an unlikely trio - including Sibylla, Queen of Jerusalem. She was the last of a line of formidable female rulers in the Crusader States …
 
Nowhere on Earth is there an ecological transformation so swift and so extreme as between the snow line of the high Andes and the tropical rainforest of Amazonia. Because of that, the different disciplines that research the human past in South America have tended to treat these two great subzones of the continent as self-contained enough to be stud…
 
The road from medieval manuscripts to medieval memes! The Medieval Grad Podcast looks at digitized manuscripts with Suzette Van Haaren, who recently defended her dissertation in Art History at the University of Groningen and at the University of Saint-Andrews. Suzette studies the ins and outs of digitized manuscripts and tells all their secrets to …
 
Genghis Khan is still considered one of the most famous and most feared warrior kings in history. But his name still divides opinion. To some, he was the ruthless conqueror of great civilisations, for others a hero who united nomadic tribes and created an enlightened empire. But who was the real Genghis Khan? In today's episode, Matt is joined by h…
 
The Irish Annals are full -- full, we tell you -- of detailed histories of the kings of Ireland. Only mostly the details are their names, how long they ruled, and how they died. Though Bran Ardchenn and Eithne were burned to death in a church, we don't know more than that. In this episode, we discuss early Irish history, the Book of Leinster, and A…
 
This week, Danièle speaks with Barbara Newman about the self in the Middle Ages, how others could shape and transform a person inside and out, and how a medieval person's idea of self reflected their relationship to other people and the world around them, both physical and spiritual. (TW: infant death)…
 
1,900 miles west of South America and 1,250 miles from any other population centre, Easter Island - or Rapa Nui - is world famous for its monolithic stone statues. But new evidence indicates that the isle's infamous prehistoric 'societal collapse' may actually be a myth. With the help of fresh techniques and research, Robert DiNapoli and his team f…
 
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