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Gone Medieval

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Gone Medieval

History Hit

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From long-lost Viking ships to kings buried in unexpected places; from murders and power politics, to myths, religion, the lives of ordinary people: Gone Medieval is History Hit’s podcast dedicated to the middle ages, in Europe and far beyond. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
 
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Medievalíssimo

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Medievalíssimo

Podcasts Clio

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Sejam todos e todas bem-vindos ao Medievalíssimo, o seu podcast de história e historiografia medieval! Temos como missão produzir história medieval pública, se afastando de todo misticismos, apologias e preconceitos em relação ao período. Contato: medivalissimo@gmail.com Siga o Medievalíssimo no Instagram no @medievalissimo
 
Join your hosts as they discuss the highs and lows of medieval living history and re-enactment. Through their personal experiences, and with a help from expert guests and friends, they walk you through lessons learned in the hobby and set you on the right path to success.
 
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MedievalPod

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MedievalPod

Emily Price

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Medieval Pod is a podcast focused on conversations with medievalists, scholars, and enthusiasts about themes related to medieval culture that can be seen in our modern life. This podcast and its accompanying website are a resource for anyone who wants to learn more about the medieval period, from some of the most exciting new voices in medieval studies and related fields.
 
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The Medieval World

1
The Medieval World

W.J.B. Mattingly

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Welcome to The Medieval World Podcast, where we explore fun and interesting pieces of medieval history. Each Friday, I publish a new episode. In addition to episodes, check out my lectures below. If there's an episode or series you would like to see, let me know via email at themedievalworldpodcast@gmail.com. Also, you can follow me on twitter at: https://twitter.com/wjb_mattingly . I am also starting to create videos of my lectures at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxmN86fC3uYC9JW-hKV4Z1w.
 
Open the doors to medieval history! Discussions on history of the medieval period of the world, specifically Europe and Scandinavia. Hosted by Wendy Jordan, MPhil (Master's) in archeology from Cambridge University (UK) and BA in history from the University of Oklahoma. Produced by RDG Communications. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/randy-gibson8/support
 
Curso de Historia de la filosofía en el grado de Historia y Geografía de la Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia (UNED, España), por Quintín Racionero (1948-2012). Los vídeos están disponibles en: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=clm30iH0HrI&list=PLDaXsgoDYf7ZvZALgoI9j0o2CAfXoIiEZ
 
A history podcast about the Middle Ages and warfare during those times. From knights to Vikings, crusaders to kings, we will explore the medieval world and its military history. Hosted by the editor of Medieval Warfare magazine, this podcast features guests discussing various topics about warfare, including battles, sieges, weapons, military organization, chivalry and more. We will have conversations with the leading historians and archaeologists in the field, who can tell us about the lates ...
 
The Faculty is one of the leading centres for the study of European language, literature, and culture world-wide, offering expertise in the entire chronological range from the earliest times to the present day, and with specialists in film studies, cultural studies, and cultural history as well as languages and literatures.
 
Ever wanted to understand the key themes driving over five hundred years of European history? In this album, architecture reveals the social, religious and economic fortunes of some of the most influential people between 1400 and 1900. By the end of the 19th century Queen Victoria presided over the vast British Empire. She looked out from London, the heart of her empire, with its buildings echoing Imperial Rome. Brussels’ architecture, like London’s, was also designed to show the world the p ...
 
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show series
 
We don’t even know the real name of the 11th century author Murasaki Shikibu. But we do know that her book, The Tale of Genji, is arguably one of the most influential Japanese texts to date. Genji quickly captured its readers’ imaginations with political intrigue and court drama, but it can also be read as an astute critique of Japanese elite socie…
 
Charles III recently became King at the age of 73 - the oldest man ever to become a British monarch. That might not seem so odd to us today, but had he been a child it would certainly have raised eyebrows. The idea of a child monarch is today practically unthinkable; in the Medieval period it was relatively common. But the rule of a boy king did no…
 
Have you ever heard of archeobotany? It’s the study of ancient plants! Alice Wolff, a PhD candidate in medieval studies at Cornell University tells Lucie Laumonier about her research, which takes her from the fields to the lab. Alice Wolff studies ancient grain and chards to find out about agricultural practices and the impact of climate change on …
 
Sarah is once again joined by guest Elizabeth Bonnemann as we dive back into Doctor Who with our first audio drama! Join us as we tackle 2000 audio serial “The Marian Conspiracy” and explore Catholic-Protestant conflicts, ale and beer in Early Modern English taverns, and the not-quite-medieval history of the cardigan. Social Media:Twitter @mediaeva…
 
This week, Danièle revisits her TEDx talk, History in Three Dimensions, five years later to reflect on what's changed in the field, to give you some of the footnotes, and to explore what couldn't be squeezed into eighteen nerve-wracking minutes. You can find out about Medievalists.net at https://linktr.ee/medievalists.net…
 
Laws regulating war crimes have existed since ancient times, and trials of people who have committed them have existed as well; the trial of Peter von Hagenbach wasn't unusual for being a trial to judge whether he has violated laws of war when he was holding down Breisach for Charles the Bold; it was unusual because it was an international trial, a…
 
Hello and welcome to Medieval Murder, the podcast that brings all things gruesome and historical to the comfort of your own home or car or wherever it is you’re listening from. My name is Hannah Purtymun and I’m here with my father Kevin Purtymun to discuss some of the most famous and infamous murders that took place in the Medieval and Early Moder…
 
A standalone episode on the travels and career of a Ming dynasty diplomat and administrator. Chen Cheng would suffer professional setbacks outside of his control, and he would make the overland journey to Shah Rukh's Timurid Herat. If you like what you hear and want to chip in to support the podcast, my Patreon is here. I'm on Twitter @circus_human…
 
This extra minisode of Medieval Death Trip offers a bit of historical perspective on the recent death of Queen Elizabeth II by looking back at accounts of the death of Queen Elizabeth I in 1603. Also, a surprisingly relevant but brief account of the Calendar (New Style) Act of 1750. Text: - Birch, Thomas. Memoirs of the reign of Queen Elizabeth, fr…
 
Martha Rampton, Trafficking with Demons: Magic, Ritual, and Gender from Late Antiquity to 1000 (Cornell University Press, 2021) explores how magic was perceived, practiced, and prohibited in western Europe during the first millennium CE. Through the overlapping frameworks of religion, ritual, and gender, Martha Rampton connects early Christian reck…
 
Italian court culture of the fifteenth century was a golden age, gleaming with dazzling princes, splendid surfaces, and luminous images that separated the lords from the (literally) lackluster masses. In Brilliant Bodies: Fashioning Courtly Men in Early Renaissance Italy (Pennsylvania State University Press, 2022), Timothy McCall describes and inte…
 
The Gift of Rumi: Experiencing the Wisdom of the Sufi Master (St. Martin’s Press, 2022), written by Dr. Emily Jane O’Dell was published by St. Martin’s Press in 2022. In this rich and insightful book, Dr. O’Dell takes us through her own spiritual and physical travels, as well as gives us historical and Islamic mystic context to help us understand a…
 
Great poetry or beautiful prose if often capable of challenging and delighting readers far more than dry, bland language. But why is that? Dalā’il al-Iʿjaz, or Indications of Inimitability, is a hugely influential Arabic text about exactly what it is that makes beautiful language beautiful. Its author, Abd al-Qāhir al-Jurjānī, used a theoretical, a…
 
What comes to mind when we think of swans? Likely their beauty in domestic settings, their preserved status, their association with royalty, and possibly even the phrase ‘swan song’. Dr. Natalie Goodison’s Introducing the Medieval Swan (University of Wales Press, 2022) explores the emergence of each of these ideas, starting with an examination of t…
 
The emergence of the Gothic style in twelfth-century France - with its pointed arches, flying buttresses and stained glass windows - triggered an explosion of cathedral-building across western Europe. But behind every great cathedral lay human stories of competition, triumph and tragedy. In today’s episode of Gone Medieval, Matt Lewis talks to Dr. …
 
Royal Childhood and Child Kingship: Boy Kings in England, Scotland, France and Germany, c. 1050–1262 (Cambridge University Press, 2022) refines adult-focused perspectives on medieval rulership. Dr. Emily Joan Ward exposes the problematic nature of working from the assumption that kingship equated to adult power. Children's participation and politic…
 
Dr. Cat Jarman concludes her month-long series about her favourite, specialist subject - the Vikings. Cnut the Great became King of England in 1016, King of Denmark in 1018 and King of Norway in 1028, creating the North Sea Empire. In today’s episode Cat talks to Dr. Caitlin Ellis about Cnut, his impact and legacy, and the end of the Viking Era. Th…
 
Nomads: The Wanderers Who Shaped Our World (W. W. Norton & Company, 2022) by Anthony Sattin tells the remarkable story of how nomads have fostered and refreshed civilization throughout history. Moving across millennia, Nomads explores the transformative, sometimes bloody, sometimes peaceful and symbiotic relationship between settled and mobile soci…
 
Castles have held a pivotal place in British life, many of them remaining today as powerful reminders of our history and sources of inspiration. But castles were also homes and status symbols as well as hubs of life, activity, and imagination. In today’s edition of Gone Medieval, Matt Lewis discusses the castle’s early genesis from the Norman Conqu…
 
In 1346, a catastrophic plague beset Europe and its neighbours. The Black Death was a human tragedy that abruptly halved entire populations and caused untold suffering, but it also brought about a cultural and economic renewal on a scale never before witnessed. The World the Plague Made is a panoramic history of how the bubonic plague revolutionize…
 
This week, Danièle reflects on the funeral of Queen Elizabeth II, how it relates back to medieval royal funerals, and what traditional elements may be left behind in the future. You can join the online course Medieval Gender and Sexuality at https://medievalstudies.thinkific.com/courses/medieval-gender-sexuality…
 
What did Baltic crusaders feel when fighting on the battlefield? Or, more precisely, what were they supposed to feel, according to chroniclers? In this episode of the Medieval Grad Podcast, Lucie talks with Patrick Eickman, a PhD student in history at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Patrick studies the Baltic crusades through the fascinating l…
 
Synopsis Bro! You knew it was coming! Grab your replica Sutton Hoo helmet and get ready, it’s Beowulf o’clock. Annotations 1/ Spoiler alert: it wasn’t published as episode 50. [But that’s ok! –Jesse] 2/ We talked about Cotton in episode 39 note 8. Here is more info on the Cotton collection: https://www.bl.uk/collection-guides/cotton-manuscripts htt…
 
Few people in European history have had as many stories told about them as the Vikings. We know about them from novels, films, TV series and games. But telling stories about the Vikings is nothing new. In fact the richest stories come from the Middle Ages in the form of sagas that were mainly written down in Iceland. As part of her special month of…
 
Henry of Trastámara, of Henry of Castile, the Fratricidal, was not as friendly with the Jews of Spain as his half-brother, Pedro the Cruel, or Pedro the Just (depending on your interpretation of him) had been. He's "The Fratricidal," by the way, because he murdered his half-brother Pedro the Cruel or Just. Henry wasn't yet king in 1355 -- that is, …
 
Ollie said he would return for DnD....Sarah just didn't tell him which DnD it would be!Join us as we discuss season 1 of the Amazon Prime adaptation of Critical Roles Vox Machina campaign. Can some voice actors improv a better story with more pathos and drama than most highly paid hollywood screenwriters? you bet your sweet butts they can!…
 
Dan Jones is world-famous for writing swashbuckling factual history. But now he’s turned his hand to historical fiction with a debut novel Essex Dogs. It’s the first of a trilogy set in the Hundred Years War, in particular during the Crécy Campaign when England conducted large-scale raids throughout northern France. In today’s episode of Gone Medie…
 
From roughly 1346 to 1353, Europe was paralyzed by the most fatal pandemic in recorded human history; the bubonic plague. The plague killed more than 60% of the total population in Eurasia. This is the backdrop of Giovanni Boccaccio’s The Decameron, a collection of short novellas completed in 1353. Robert Pogue Harrison is a professor of French and…
 
This week, Danièle speaks with Meg Leja about the relationship between bodies and souls in medical thought in the early Middle Ages, why people were meant to care deeply for both, and where medieval people believed the soul to be located in the body. You can support this podcast on Patreon at https://www.patreon.com/medievalists…
 
Empires of the Normans: Makers of Europe, Conquerors of Asia (Pegasus, 2022) by Dr. Levi Roach is a tale of ambitious adventures and fierce freebooters, of fortunes made and fortunes lost. The Normans made their influence felt across all of western Europe and the Mediterranean, from the British Isles to North Africa, and Lisbon to the Holy Land. In…
 
Often represented as a tradition of ancient origins, Shugendō has retained a quality of mystery and nostalgia in the public imagination and scholars as the “original” champions of mountain asceticism. In his monograph, A Path Into the Mountains: Shugendō and Mount Togakushi (U Hawaii Press, 2022), Caleb Carter challenges this conceptualization by e…
 
September is Vikings month on Gone Medieval, as Dr. Cat Jarman presents a mini-series about her favourite, specialist subject. Over four episodes, Cat is taking a deep dive into the Viking age, looking at how it all started, how it all ended, and the stories we tell about those people from the north in between. In this second episode, Cat tells how…
 
This episode we return to the Lanercost Chronicle (and a bit of Capgrave's Chronicle) to get some serious history concerning the fall of the last native prince of Wales, before getting some a less serious dinner party anecdote about a couple of monkeys. Much hand-wringing is also given to the appropriate pronunciation of the name Llewellyn/Llywelyn…
 
Queen Elizabeth II has died after 70 years on the British throne. Born in April 1926, Elizabeth Windsor became heir apparent, aged 10, when her uncle Edward VIII abdicated and her father George VI became king. In 1947 – She married navy lieutenant Philip Mountbatten, a Greek Prince, at London’s Westminster Abbey before being crowned there in 1953 i…
 
Silvia Schwarz Linder's Goddess Traditions in India: Theological Poems and Philosophical Tales in the Tripurarahasya (Routledge, 2022) is a study of the Śrīvidyā and Śākta traditions in the context of South Indian intellectual history in the late middle ages. Associated with the religious tradition known as Śrīvidyā and devoted to the cult of the G…
 
It's September: a time for fresh starts, as well as a time when every career and educational decision may seem large and looming. This week, Danièle shares the story of how her many false starts, successes, and failures led to her career as an indie medievalist. If you enjoy this podcast, please consider supporting it on Patreon at https://www.patr…
 
Today’s episode of Gone Medieval is brought to you by Paradox Interactive, the creators of the game Crusader Kings III. In it, Matt Lewis explores all of the logistics of going on a Medieval crusade and how the first crusade played out. Matt has been losing whole weekends to this game! If you want to experience the grand strategy adventure and delv…
 
Celebrating Sorrow: Medieval Tributes to the Tale of Sagoromo (Cornell UP, 2022) explores the medieval Japanese fascination with grief in tributes to The Tale of Sagoromo, the classic story of a young man whose unrequited love for his foster sister leads him into a succession of romantic tragedies as he rises to the imperial throne. Charo B. D'Etch…
 
September is Vikings month on Gone Medieval, as Dr. Cat Jarman presents a mini-series about her favourite, specialist subject. Over her next four episodes, Cat will be taking a deep dive into the Viking age, looking at how it all started, how it all ended, and the stories we tell about those people from the north in between. In this first episode, …
 
Media-eval is back this week with something a little different! Join Sarah and guest Erika Harlitz-Kern, of The Boomerang, as we discuss what it means to be public medievalists - and discuss Erika's future appearance to discuss the upcoming film Medieval! Social Media:Twitter @mediaevalpodE-mail: media.evalpod@gmail.comFind Erika on Twitter @eh_ker…
 
Outside Medieval London’s city walls, Southwark was a land without rules. It was the place where people went to indulge their love of theatre, watch bear baiting and visit brothels. It was also under the control of the Bishop of Winchester. In this edition of Gone Medieval - originally released as an episode of History Hit’s Betwixt the Sheets podc…
 
Summary Summertime, and the living is Medieval. But really, what was summer like in the Middle Ages? We talk about the Medieval Climate Anomaly, the (not at all Medieval) Little Ice Age, the volcano on Santorini, Medieval vacation tendencies, the Tres Riches Heures of the Duc de Berry, and the Olympics. Also, Firesign Theatre references! Brief cont…
 
This week, Danièle answers your burning medieval questions from social media and Patreon, covering everything from diapers, to sleep, to the mysterious Green Man. To learn more about the online courses from Medievalists.net, please visit https://medievalstudies.thinkific.com/Medievalists.net
 
The story of Ghiyath al-Din and the other Timurid envoys, and their visit to Yongle's Beijing. If you like what you hear and want to chip in to support the podcast, my Patreon is here. I'm on Twitter @circus_human, Instagram @humancircuspod, and I have some things on Redbubble. Sources: "Report to Mirza Baysunghur on the Timurid Legation to the Min…
 
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