Presidential открытые
[search 0]
Больше

Download the App!

show episodes
 
P
Presidential

1
Presidential

The Washington Post

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Ежемесячно
 
The Washington Post's Presidential podcast explores how each former American president reached office, made decisions, handled crises and redefined the role of commander-in-chief. It was released leading up to up to Election Day 2016, starting with George Washington in week one and ending on week 44 with the president-elect. New special episodes in the countdown to the 2020 presidential election highlight other stories from U.S. presidential history that can help illuminate our current momen ...
 
It’s the most powerful position in American politics—and arguably, the world. But behind the oath to preserve, protect and defend, lie dark secrets posed to leave some legacies in disgrace. Uncover the most damning details surrounding history’s most high-profile leaders in the Spotify Original from Parcast, Very Presidential with Ashley Flowers. Every Tuesday through the 2020 election, host Ashley Flowers shines a light on the darker side of the American presidency… From torrid love affairs ...
 
VPRO-presentator Chris Kijne en de NRC-correspondent in de VS maken een twee wekelijkse podcast. Ze bespreken het laatste nieuws rond de Amerikaanse president, Donald Trump. Wees op de hoogte en luister mee in The Presidential Podcast, een samenwerking van NRC en VPRO Bureau Buitenland. Seizoen 1: met NRC-correspondent Guus Valk per 1 augustus 2018: Seizoen 2: met NRC-correspondent Bas Blokker
 
Join us as we take a fun and informative look at the history of Presidential elections in the United States of America as well as all sorts of topics directly related to how our government and elections work! We also delve into the reasons and policies (Constitutional or otherwise) behind exactly what makes the highest offices in the land tick.
 
No matter which way you lean, the fact is we have had and will continue to have American Presidents. Learn more about them all past, present, and future with your host, Phil Treacy, as he takes you on a detailed and educational tour of each. Find out more of their Early Years, Young Adulthoods, Political and Professional Careers and the Legacies of the men who have been elected President. Find all this and more via The Presidential Bio Podcast on The 2GuysTalking Podcast Network.
 
P
Presidential Fight Club

1
Presidential Fight Club

James Early & Scott Rank

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Ежемесячно
 
Historians have ranked U.S. presidents on leadership, economic management, and pursuing justice, but they have never asked themselves which one could beat up all the others. This show will change that. Hosted by two history professors—James Early and Scott Rank—this is an NCAA-style tournament in which all presidents fight each other one-on-one until there is one champion. You'll see Barack Obama fight William Howard Taft (who literally weights twice as much), Abraham Lincoln try to knock th ...
 
Battleground Ohio: Assessing the 2016 Presidential Race – a weekly podcast from the Political Science Department at Bowling Green State University. Insights on the race from BGSU’s experts in American politics with a special emphasis on the biggest battleground state of them all, Ohio.
 
Kennedy Library Forums are a series of public affairs programs offered by the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum to foster public discussion on a diverse range of historical, political and cultural topics reflecting the legacy of President and Mrs. Kennedy's White House years. They are conducted as conversations rather than lectures.
 
Loading …
show series
 
In 1908, Theodore Roosevelt and William Howard Taft were such great friends, TR personally campaigned for Taft to succeed him to the presidency. Four years later, that relationship was so irrevocably damaged that TR split the GOP in half to deny Taft's reelection. There's no way around, Taft's presidency was made by Roosevelt, and then it was unmad…
 
Theodore Roosevelt is the youngest American to become president. He's also the youngest American to become a former president, which means the hyper-energetic TR had plenty of time to do whatever he wanted with the rest of his life. In Roosevelt's case, that meant going on a bunch of suicidally dangerous adventures in search of death or glory. Join…
 
When Theodore Roosevelt was sworn in to replace the assassinated William McKinley, he was well aware that almost every previous accidental president had been a failure, and none had won reelection. He had a plan to buck the trend, and it started with winning over McKinley's cabinet. Join me as I interview presidential scholar Lindsay M. Chervinsky,…
 
When you hear the name Theodore Roosevelt, a face, personality, and image all pop into mind - Just the way Roosevelt wanted. Presidents have always dealt with and nurtured the press, but Teddy was a quantum leap forward in presidential PR, and he used the media to advance his career, his policies, and to create an image of himself that has lasted 1…
 
Theodore Roosevelt is one of the biggest personalities to ever inhabit the presidency, so of course he was born in New York City. Roosevelt was heir to one of the city's oldest families and a civil servant at nearly every level - state assemblyman, police commissioner, and governor of the Empire State. Join me as I talk with Ted Kohn, the Dean of t…
 
Born with a silver spoon in his mouth, Theodore Roosevelt is one of the most unlikely champions of progressive reform. Yet there he is, ushering in the American progressive era, promising a "square deal" to all. Join me as I talk with Alycia, host of the excellent Civics and Coffee podcast, about the origins and impact of TR's environment, economic…
 
Students, teachers and historians reflect on what has changed — and should change — about the way we teach presidential history today. This special episode features presidential experts Barbara Perry and Julian Zelizer, “How the Word Is Passed” author Clint Smith, and the AP government and politics class of teacher Michael Martirone.…
 
In 1898, Theodore Roosevelt was a pencil-pushing desk jockey with no clear political future. Six months later, he was the war-hero governor-elect of New York and well on his way to the presidential ticket. How'd he do it? Follow along as Roosevelt pushes the nation toward war with Spain, quits the safety of his Washington desk job to fight in Cuba,…
 
How did a country founded by anti-imperial revolutionaries come to own an empire of its own? The answer starts with William McKinley, whose administration exploded onto the international stage by carrying the American flag to Cuba, the Philippines, Puerto Rico, Guam, Hawaii, and China. Join me as I talk with Robert Merry, a 40-year veteran of Washi…
 
When William McKinley ran for president in 1896, he out-raised his opponent 7-to-1, printed more campaign literature than all previous GOP presidential candidates combined, and organized what is often called the first modern presidential campaign. How'd he do it? Join me as I talk with professor Christopher McKnight Nichols, director of the Oregon …
 
Once upon a time, the United States stuck to its shores and big business largely stayed out of politics. Then came William McKinley. William McKinley took the United States international in a big way, carrying the American flag to Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Philippines, and China; he revolutionized political campaigning by leveraging the power of big b…
 
What was Grover Cleveland hiding in 1893? When the famously honest president was diagnosed with mouth cancer, he decided to keep it from the public at all costs - even if that meant hatching a hair-brained scheme to surgically remove the tumor on a yacht at sea. Join me as I talk with award-winning journalist and author Matthew Algeo, author of All…
 
In 1892, the rich were getting richer, the poor were getting poorer, and a former president decided to run again against the rival who had defeated him. How similar is the Gilded Age to our modern political and economic moment? Join me as I talk with University Kentucky professor Mark Summers, a historian of the Gilded Age and author of numerous bo…
 
On the final day of Grover Cleveland's first term in office, his wife turned to a member of the white house staff and said. "I want you to take good care of all the furniture and ornaments in the house, for I want everything just as it is now when we come back again. We are coming back. Just four years from today." Four years later, she was right. …
 
Benjamin Harrison presidential accomplishments range from obtaining America's first overseas possession to signing an anti-trust bill that is still the law of the land, but he's hardly known today. Why? Join me as I talk with Charles Hyde, the President and CEO of the Benjamin Harrison Presidential Site in Indianapolis, Indiana, on why Benjamin Har…
 
Is it possible to win your way to defeat? Benjamin Harrison and the 51st Congress might say so. After passing almost all the legislation they had campaigned on in 1889, American voters dealt them crippling defeats in 1891 and 1893. What went wrong? Join me as I interview Charles Calhoun, a retired distinguished professor of History at East Carolina…
 
When it comes to politicians, promises made + promises kept is supposed to = reelection, right? For Benjamin Harrison and the 51st GOP Congress, this common sense equation failed in a major way. After passing more legislation than almost any Congress in U.S. history, Harrison and the GOP majority were sent packing in one of the most lopsided congre…
 
How do you break a 28-year losing streak? It takes good strategy, a bit of luck, and sometimes whatever the heck a mugwump is. Join me as I interview Ted Kohn, the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts at Norwich University and a historian of the Gilded Age in American History, on how the Democrats ended an era of Republican rule. Support the show (h…
 
What do you do when your party hasn't won a presidential election in 28 years? You find an outsider and roll the dice. Grover Cleveland's political career was less than three years old when the Democratic party nominated him for president in 1884, but that guaranteed a candidate with a clean record - or so they thought. Get ready for a sex scandal …
 
Chester A. Arthur is a 19th-century American politics version of Breaking Bad mashed with Darth Vader's redemption story. Ok. There's no meth or space sorcery. But there is a seemingly noble man who jettisons his values when they get in the way of making a buck. (Ok, a LOT of bucks). And then, after a lifetime of proving himself a good-for-nothing …
 
Chester A. Arthur is the most corrupt politician to ever become president. For years, he made a fortune making sure enough money disappeared from the New York City customs house to keep his patron in power. When a backroom deal made him vice president and an assassin's bullet ended James Garfield's presidency and began Arthur's, the nation despaire…
 
It's Obama time! We are skipping ahead in the narrative to talk with UNC professor Claude A. Clegg, author of the recently published book The Black President: Hope and Fury in the Age of Obama, about the Obama administration, race, and the challenges and opportunities that come with writing contemporary history. Support the show (https://www.patreo…
 
James Garfield has been called, "The best president we never had." What did we lose when he was assassinated? A champion for the abandoned freedmen? A guiding light in an age of corruption? Or just another politician, same as the rest? Join me as I interview to Todd Arrington, a historian and site manager at the James A. Garfield National Historic …
 
James Garfield didn't want to be president, but the 1880 Republican Convention nominated him against his will. And do you know what thanks he got for it? Assassinated within six months. But Garfield has a lot to teach us in his fascinating rags-to-riches life and the fierce political battles he waged during his short term in office for, in just a f…
 
Rutherford B. Hayes is known to history as the President who ended Reconstruction, but is that a fair monicker? What did Hayes think of slavery, the freedmen, and Reconstruction, anyway? Join me as I interview to Dustin McLochlin, a historian at the Rutherford B Hayes Presidential Library and Museums in Fremont, Ohio, on Hayes' evolving views on sl…
 
How do you lead a nation when half the country thinks you were fraudulently elected? I'm not talking about 2021, I'm talking about 1877, when Rutherford B Hayes emerged the winner of an election that was so vigorously contested, he wasn't even officially declared the winner until two days before inauguration day. But what did Hayes win? A nation th…
 
President Lincoln and General Grant formed one of the most successful president-general partnerships in American history, winning the Civil War and defeating the Confederacy. But before that partnership could turn to the challenge of reconstruction, Lincoln was assassinated, leaving the nation in the incapable hands of Andrew Johnson. Four years la…
 
Ulysses S. Grant's reputation has been through a lot. While he was still alive, he was very nearly our first three-term president; after he died, the Myth of the Lost Cause repainted him as a drunk and corrupt butcher; in the past 30 years, he's started to become a Civil Rights Icon as historians gave him a long overdue second look. Join me as I in…
 
Ulysses S. Grant led an Odyssey of a life. From the battlefields of the Mexican-American War, to the get-rich-quick frontier of the California Gold Rush, to years of poverty in St. Louis, Grant was shaped by a dizzying array of diverse experiences. Join me as I interview Nick Sacco, a park ranger at Ulysses S. Grant National Historic Site in St. Lo…
 
They say history is written by the victor. Ulysses S Grant may beg to differ. For nearly 100 years, Grant was derided as an inept and corrupt drunk who won the Civil War by recklessly sacrificing the lives of his men and who floundered in a presidency rife with corruption. In the past 30 years, that verdict has changed. Follow along as Grant goes f…
 
Andrew Johnson is the only president to face a Senate impeachment in our first 200 years. What did he do to get impeached? Who were the men out to get him? And how did he beat his conviction and removal from office by a single vote? Join me as I interview David O Stewart, a lawyer, historian, and author of numerous books about presidential history,…
 
In the wake of Abraham Lincoln's assassination, former vice president Andrew Johnson was faced with a tremendous challenge: How do you mend relations between the north and south, two regions that had spend the past four years killing each other on the field of battle? And what do you do about the south's 3.5 million newly freed former slaves who ow…
 
Jefferson Davis was never president of all the United States, but he was president of half of them. Follow Davis as parlays his status as a Mexican-American war hero into a political career as a fiery southern radical, serves as Secretary of War, get's his dream job as general of the confederate Mississippi armies, and days later gets the job he ne…
 
Six of the seven presidents who followed Lincoln served in the Union Army during the Civil War. In our final look at Honest Abe, join me as I interview Jon White, an associate professor of American Studies at Christopher Newport University and author of Emancipation, the Union Army, and the Reelection of Abraham Lincoln , on Lincoln's relationship …
 
Abraham Lincoln is the most experienced trial lawyer we've ever elected president, with more than two decades of experience litigating in the courtroom. Join me as I talk to Brian Dirck, a professor of History at Anderson University in Anderson, Indiana, and author of Lincoln the Lawyer, as we discuss how those decades of practicing the law prepare…
 
Think the press is biased today? Take a look at it in the 19th century, when papers were so partisan they were practically departments of their parties. Join me as I interview Harold Holzer, director of the Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College in New York City, Chairman of the Lincoln Forum, and author of The presidents vs. the…
 
The debate over slavery is was old as independence. What made Lincoln to end it with the emancipation of the slaves? Join me as I interview Kate Masur, an associate professor of 19th-century American History at Northwestern University and author of Until Justice Be Done: America’s First Civil Rights Movement, from the Revolution to Reconstruction, …
 
How did Lincoln keep the slave-holding border states in the union while also advancing the cause of emancipation? Join me as I interview Louis Masur, a distinguished professor of American Studies and History at Rutgers University and author of Lincoln’s Hundred Days: The Emancipation Proclamation and the War for the Union , on the tightrope act Lin…
 
When Abraham Lincoln was elected, the south didn't take it too well. Before he was even sworn in, seven states had already seceded, and four more joined the confederacy in the months that followed. The fate of the union was at stake. Follow along as Lincoln goes from country lawyer to U.S. President and then leads the nation to reunification by win…
 
Was James Buchanan secretly the nation's first gay president? Join me as I interview historian Thomas Balcerski, author of Bosom Friends, the intimate world of James Buchanan and William Rufus King, on the 150-year-old rumors about Buchanan's sexuality. We'll also dive into Buchanan's presidency and ask, what can we learn from a man widely consider…
 
In 1857, the debate over slavery had fractured Kansas, national political parties, and even national churches. It's easy to see why the country turned to James Buchanan, a man with one of the strongest resumes ever put in the white house. Unfortunately, he inherited 31 states, and left behind 27, as the pre-civil was secession crisis overwhelmed th…
 
"We Polked you in 44, we're Pierce you in 52!" Franklin Pierce may have my favorite campaign slogan yet. But in terms of presidencies, wow, this guy is a total disaster. I mean, Millard Fillmore just nuked the only major opposition party into oblivion. Governing should be easy, right? Not when you're Pierce, who do his best to one-up Fillmore and w…
 
When Millard Fillmore became president, the country was on the verge of collapse. President Taylor had just died, the Compromise of 1850 appeared dead, and southern secessionist were organizing a convention to plot disunion. The nation looked to Fillmore to save it. And he totally whiffed. Follow along as Fillmore uses the scapegoating of minoritie…
 
Op 10 maart 2016 kwam de eerste aflevering van de Presidential Podcast online. De kop was: ‘Kan Bernie Sanders toch nog winnen?’. En de bedoeling: de aanloop naar en de uitkomst van de presidentsverkiezingen verslaan. Little did we know. Inmiddels zijn we bijna vijf jaar verder, vijf jaar die maar door één man gedomineerd zijn: Donald J. Trump. In …
 
Na ruim vier en half jaar komt er met het einde van het Presidentschap van Donald Trump ook een einde aan de Presidential Podcast. De podcast had de opmerkelijke kandidatuur van Donald J. Trump en, na de ook voor ons onverwachte verkiezingsuitslag, diens presidentschap, als uitgangspunt en dan past het om na de inauguratie van Joe Biden aanstaande …
 
Loading …

Краткое руководство

Google login Twitter login Classic login