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The concept of artificial intelligence has been with us since 1955, when a group of researchers first proposed a study of “the simulation of human intelligence processes by machines.” At the same time, it seems like not a day goes by without news about some development, making it feel very futuristic.At Fordham, it’s the purview of professors from …
 
As summer arrives, and the trend lines for vaccinations and Covid deaths in the United States head in opposite directions, it feels like freedom is finally within reach. But let’s face it: The pandemic has taken its toll. We’re not the same people we were 15 months ago.So now, what? To help us use the lessons of the recent past to move forward in t…
 
On March 23 the Ever Given, a ship the length of the Empire State Building, ran aground in the Suez Canal, causing a traffic jam of epic proportions in one of the busiest shipping routes on the planet. When it did this, it revealed a $20 trillion sector of the worldwide economy that otherwise functions behind the scenes.The Ever Given was freed aft…
 
To say these are challenging economic times is an understatement. As Covid-19 vaccines are slowly being distributed, the promise of a revived economy seems closer than ever. Not so fast, though, as experts warn that life in the United States will probably not return to normal until the fall.And yet in spite of all of the uncertainty, entrepreneurs …
 
On January 21, 900,000 Americans filed new unemployment claims, adding to the 16 million who were claiming benefits at the beginning of the month, and a sign that the COVID-19 pandemic is still very much a threat to the economy. A second round of stimulus checks was issued by the Federal government in December, and a third round of checks is possib…
 
The vaccines are here! This month, residents of long-term health care facilities and frontline workers such as nurses and doctors began receiving the first COVID-19 vaccine approved by the FDA, and a second vaccine is expected to be rolled out in the coming weeks as well.That’s the good news.The bad news is, the coronavirus pandemic will still be w…
 
Dean McKay, a professor of psychology at Fordham, specializes in anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder, and the connections between anxiety and disgust. With winter approaching and potentially leading to more isolation, we thought it would be a good time to talk to him about what we can do to cope effectively during what is likely to be a traumati…
 
The 2020 presidential election was always going to be challenging, and then the COVID 19 pandemic added a new wrinkle to the mix. Mail-in voting has been embraced as a way to keep voters safe from the pandemic, and although many States have successfully held elections via mail and vote, there are real questions about how to expand it to the rest of…
 
On July 29 of this year, President Trump bragged on Twitter that he had "rescinded the Obama-Biden AFFH Rule," a reference to the Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing rule, which was passed by the Obama Administraton in 2014.With that, the issue of housing in American suburbs became an issue in the 2020 presidential campaign. Although the suburbs …
 
Of all the honors a business professor might snag, an Emmy would seem to be one of the least likely. But Clarence Ball III did just that in 2014, when he won one for the documentary “Looking Over Jordan: African Americans and the War.” That same year, he joined the faculty of the Gabelli School of Business as a lecturer in communications and media …
 
These days, there’s almost no aspect of commerce that hasn’t been radically transformed by technology. Uber lets you summon a privately driven car to chauffer you, Seamless let you order takeout without ever speaking to a soul, and thanks to Airbnb, you can sleep in another person’s bed. But the shift to having everything at your fingertips at the …
 
In 2016, more countries experienced violent conflict than any time in the previous 30 years. From Yemen, Syria, and Venezuela to Myanmar, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Ukraine, violence has become a more common answer to resolving disputes, and one of the consequences has been that more people are displaced around than globe since World War …
 
In 2009, Fordham and the FBI committed to bringing together the world’s best and brightest experts on law enforcement and computer science. Every 18 months, the International Conference on Cyber Security, or ICCS as it’s known, has convened leaders from academia, the private sector, and government to the University’s Lincoln Center campus. Past con…
 
The connection between criminal justice and brain chemistry can sometimes seem like science fiction, but it's very much a part of the court system today. In 2015, Fordham established the Neuroscience and Law Center, to explore how advances in neuroscience have prompted the legal profession to question long-held notions about criminal culpability, f…
 
If greenhouse gas emissions continue at the current rate, the Earth’s atmosphere will warm up by as much as 2.7 degrees Fahrenheit by 2040, leading to flooded coastlines, intensifying droughts, and human suffering and poverty. This was the stark conclusion of a landmark report issued in October by the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Clim…
 
In the last year, the phrase “me too” has become shorthand for survivors of sexual assault and harassment speaking out against their assailants. At the same time, the term “toxic masculinity” has also entered the public conversation, as a potential culprit for unrestrained, unresolved hostility toward women.Jacqueline Reich, a professor and chair o…
 
In education, few topics are more fraught with tension than school integration. A new plan being promoted in Brooklyn that does away with admissions screening processes for middle schools is being watched closely by experts and parents alike. For it to succeed, teachers will need to simultaneously teach students of different levels of academic prof…
 
In his upcoming book "League of Democracies," Fordham philosophy professor John Davenport notes that in many ways, the challenges the world's democracies face are similar to those that America's founding fathers faced in the 18th century. In this extended bonus track, Davenport delves into the ways in which game theory explains how.…
 
In 2011, a series of uprisings known as the Arab Spring briefly gave the impression that democracy was on an unstoppable march across the globe. Seven years later, it hasn’t exactly turned out that way. Egypt has embraced authoritarianism, Libya is in a state of near anarchy, and Syria has been mired in a catastrophic civil war for seven years. Mea…
 
It’s September, which means students are flocking back to campus after the summer break. At Fordham’s school of Professional and Continuing Studies, 300 of those enrolled this fall will be participating in the Veterans Administration’s Yellow Ribbon program, which covers tuition and fees for eligible post 9/11 veterans at select colleges.This past …
 
In this extra track, Gregory Acevedo, an associate professor at Fordham’s Graduate School of Social Service, talks about the mental health needs of Puerto Ricans affected by Hurricane Maria who are expected to move to areas such as Florida and New York City this year.FordhamNotes
 
Few issues burn hotter on the worldwide stage today than immigration. In May, President Trump instituted a zero-tolerance policy for anyone arriving at the southern border, and the issue has rattled Europe as well. We sat down recently with Gregory Acevedo, an associate professor at Fordham’s Graduate School of Social Service and an expert on issue…
 
The day after a June 12 visit to Singapore for the first ever meeting between the leaders of the United States and North Korea, President Trump tweeted:“Before taking office people were assuming that we were going to War with North Korea. President Obama said that North Korea was our biggest and most dangerous problem. No longer - sleep well tonigh…
 
In a career spanning five decades, Father Daniel Sullivan, SJ, professor emeritus of biology, has traveled far and wide. His expertise in invasive species, particularly insects, took him far from his native Queens and from the Rose Hill campus, where he first set foot as an undergraduate in 1946. We sat down with him recently to talk about the ways…
 
The professional sports market in the U.S. was worth about $60 billion in 2014, and according to Forbes, it’s expected to reach $73 billion by 2019. We sat down with Mark Conrad, Director of the Sports Business Concentration at Fordham’s Gabelli School of Business, to get a sense of where leagues such as the NFL, Major League Baseball and the NCAA …
 
The same day Distinguished Professor of Theology Elizabeth Johnson sat down to talk about her new book, Creation and the Cross, the death of renowned theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking dominated the headlines. In this bonus track, Johnson reflects on Hawking, an avowed atheist.FordhamNotes
 
In her new book Creation and the Cross, Distinguished Professor of Theology Elizabeth Johnson, CSJ, challenges us to reconsider cosmic redemption. It's an ancient concept that fell out of favor in the 11th century, but is needed more than ever in a time of advancing ecological devastation.FordhamNotes
 
This year, one of the ten films vying for the Best Picture Oscar award is The Shape of Water, a film by Mexican director Guillermo del Toro. It's safe to say this is the first year that a fishman/woman romance flick has been nominated for Tinselstown's top award, so we sat down with professor Miguel Garcia, an expert on both Mexican Literature and …
 
Award-winning journalist David Gibson assumed the title of director of Fordham University’s Center on Religion and Culture on July 1. In a wide ranging interview, he discusses his vision for the center's future, including his dream panel discussion, and where Star Wars fits in it all.FordhamNotes
 
Award-winning journalist David Gibson assumed the title of director of Fordham University’s Center on Religion and Culture on July 1. In a wide ranging interview, he discusses his vision for the center's future, including his dream panel discussion, and where Star Wars fits in it all.FordhamNotes
 
Hope and faith are common threads in American pop culture, and Kathryn Reklis, an assistant professor of theology, often addresses both in a monthly column in the journal The Christian Century. Reklis sat down with with us recently to talk about how, after a year in which hope has been in short supply, it's still alive today.…
 
The tax reform plan currently being debated in Congress is a complicated endeavor with so many moving parts, it can be hard to understand what it ultimately means for the average American. To help sort through it all, we sat down with Stanley Veliotis. Ph.D., an associate professor of accounting and taxation at the Gabelli School of Business.…
 
The 1965 murder of Kitty Genovese in Queens first alerted people to what became known as the "bystander effect." The original reporting by the New York Times, that her death was witnessed by 38 witnesses who did nothing, was debunked a long time ago, but the story has still resonated as a sort of parable about the callousness of urban living. Harol…
 
If it's mid-May in New York City, you can be sure that pollen will be plentiful. To learn more about what's behind all our watery eyes and sneezing, we sat down with Guy Robinson, a senior lecturer of natural sciences. Robinson runs the Fordham Pollen Index, which is based on pollen collected from the air at the Lincoln Center campus and the Louis …
 
The World Trade Organization meetings in 1999, the Iraq war in 2003, the Tea Party in 2009, Occupy Wall Street in 2011, Black Lives Matter in 2013—major protests in the United States took on a different feel at the turn of the century. And yet, 2017 feels as if something has changed yet again.Why do some protests succeed and some fail? Why is the T…
 
Celia Fisher, Ph.D., the Marie Ward Doty University Chair in Ethics, professor of psychology and director of Fordham's Center for Ethics Education, discusses the pitfalls of diagnosing a public figure with a mental disorder without having interviewed them in person.FordhamNotes
 
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