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The Cambridge Festival of Ideas takes place every autumn, open to and aimed at the general public. The Guardian is the festival's national media partner. A series of talks takes place every evening, which are recorded and made available for download on the Culture section of the Guardian website
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The episode explores the topic of political legitimacy in a polarized world. The guests discuss the psychological and cognitive components of political beliefs, the impact of polarization on journalism, and the importance of understanding the perspectives of people on the ground. They emphasize the need for flexible thinking, reevaluating our own d…
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In this episode of Crossing Channels, Rory Cellan-Jones talks to experts, Dr Stephanie Diepeveen and Prof Jordanna Matlon about the enduring legacies of colonialism on global economic inequalities, the climate crisis, and the digital space.Dr Stephanie Diepeveen and Prof Jordanna Matlon share tangible examples and critical insights into a nuanced u…
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The conversation delves into the urgency of addressing concerns about artificial intelligence, the impact of AI on society, and the need for ethical considerations. We explore the challenges of bias, misinformation, and the environmental impact of AI. The guests discuss the role of academia, big tech, and the public in shaping the future of AI. The…
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This is the third interview with Mrs Charity (Cherry) Hopkins, Life Fellow of Girton College, University of Cambridge. Mrs Hopkins was interviewed for the third time on 14 February 2024 in the Squire Law Library.For more information, see the Squire Law Library website at:http://www.squire.law.cam.ac.uk/eminent-scholars-archive…
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This is the second interview with Mrs Charity (Cherry) Hopkins, Life Fellow of Girton College, University of Cambridge. Mrs Hopkins was interviewed for the second time on 16 October 2023 in the Squire Law Library.For more information, see the Squire Law Library website at:http://www.squire.law.cam.ac.uk/eminent-scholars-archive…
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Why is the world protesting so much? How has protesting changed over the years? And what impact are mass protest movements having on policymaking? To explore these questions, Rory Cellan-Jones talks to Dr Felix Dwinger (IAST), Dr Giacomo Lemoli (IAST) and Dr Lauren Wilcox (University of Cambridge).Dr Lauren Wilcox, Dr Felix Dwinger, and Dr Giacomo …
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Verity Harding, Gina Neff and Lawrence Rothenberg talk to Rory Cellan-Jones about whether nations competing for AI supremacy can really collaborate to slow down dangerous developments and what are the tradeoffs.In this episode, Rory Cellan-Jones (former technology correspondent for the BBC) chats with Verity Harding (Bennett Institute for Public Po…
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The episode explores the topic of extreme weather and its impact on communities and asks: What does extreme weather mean for us?The speakers highlight the importance of connecting research to real-world impacts and the need for collective action. They discuss the devastating losses of climate disasters, the challenges of adaptation and the power of…
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Rory Cellan-Jones talks to Emmanuelle Auriol, Nina Jörden and Francesca Barigozzi about the underrepresentation of women in certain sectors, the persistence of the motherhood wage gap, and the impact of flexible work arrangement on women’s careers.This episode asks why are women disadvantaged in the workplace? Experts explore why women are underrep…
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This podcast, hosted by Gaia Dratwinska, looks at Nicholas Ong’s research into the life and music of Russian composer, Valentia Serova (1846-1925), the creator of the first opera by a woman to be performed at the Bolshoi theatre in Moscow. Produced by Claire Watt.University of Cambridge
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In this episode, Iona Warne interviews Dr Jo, of Dr Jo Science, to investigate some surprising facts about the human body, as well as looking into how science can best be communicated to children. Facebook.com/DrJoScienceProduced by Claire Watt.University of Cambridge
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In this episode, Catalina Taylor chats with Dr Brian Ferguson, an immunologist and Associate Professor of Immunology at the University of Cambridge, about how vaccines work and why we need them. Produced by Claire Watt.University of Cambridge
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This episode sees Joanne Yau get to grips with the basics of nuclear energy, as well as taking a good look at their green potential. Featuring PhD researchers from the Nuclear Energy Futures CDT (Hannah Tipping, Martin Gillet, Will Thomas, Jason Lee and Parth Kulkarni). Produced by Claire Watt.University of Cambridge
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In this podcast, Claire Watt talks to Chris Wakefield, one of the archaeologists working on Must Farm, a Bronze Age settlement near Peterborough which has been described as ‘Britain’s Pompei’. Produced by Claire Watt.University of Cambridge
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Best-selling author Tara Westover, researcher Aliya Khalid and Thabo Msibi Deputy Vice Chancellor for Teaching and Learning at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, tackle the issue of what education should be for. They stress the idea that small actions can have a significant impact on making a difference in the world and emphasise the power of individ…
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Matthew Agarwala, Stefan Lamp and Alessio Terzi talk to Rory Cellan-Jones about the trade-offs between economic growth and environmental protection, the policies and legislations needed to achieve green growth, and the challenges associated with implementing such measures.This episode unpacks the possibility of green growth. Leading experts discuss…
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In this episode, we explore how we can build back better after a crisis. What are the challenges and opportunities of addressing the climate crisis, including the need for climate justice, the costs of inaction, and the importance of green innovation. We consider the roles of governments, multilateral institutions, and grassroots movements play in …
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So, now what? the new podcast from Gates Cambridge, a leading scholarship programme for outstanding international postgraduates at the University of Cambridge. Our guests are the scholars themselves - big thinkers from a range of different backgrounds and disciplines - who are out there finding solutions to some of our most wicked problems from the…
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Rory Cellan-Jones talks to Jean-Paul Azam, Diane Coyle and Andy Westwood about the potential of universal basic income to tackle regional inequalities, boost economic growth in ‘left behind’ and growing places, and rebuilding democracy. This episode unpacks why current policies are failing to tackle regional inequalities and how a universal basic i…
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The Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill seeks to circumvent the UK Supreme Court's recent judgment holding the Government's Rwanda policy, concerning the removal of certain asylum-seekers, to Rwanda. The Bill contemplates placing the UK in breach of its international obligations, including under the European Convention on Human Rights an…
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This is the first interview with Mrs Charity (Cherry) Hopkins, Life Fellow of Girton College, University of Cambridge. Mrs Hopkins was interviews for the first time on 13 September 2023 in the Squire Law Library.For more information, see the Squire Law Library website at http://www.squire.law.cam.ac.uk/eminent-scholars-archive…
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This is the fifteenth interview for the Eminent Scholars Archive with an incumbent of the Arthur Goodhart Visiting Professor of Legal Science. Professor McLachlan is Professor of Law at Victoria University of Wellington.Professor McLachlan was interviewed on was interviewed on 19 June and 13 September 2023 in the Squire Law Library.For more informa…
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Rory Cellan-Jones talks to Angelique Acquatella, Shan Morgan and Jennifer Dixon about the current status of digital technology adoption in healthcare services, why digital adoption is so slow, and the opportunities for medtech, individuals and the wider economy.In this episode, experts unpack the barriers and facilitators of digital healthcare. Ror…
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On the 15 November the UK Supreme Court decided that the United Kingdom's policy of sending asylum seekers to Rwanda was unlawful.In this short recording Dr Kirsty Hughes explains the Court's reasoning, and considers the Government's response and possible next steps.Kirsty Hughes is an Associate Professor specialising in Human Rights Law. She is jo…
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Rory Cellan-Jones talks to Ingela Alger (IAST) and Flavio Toxvaerd (University of Cambridge) about the drivers of research silos, the merits of conducting interdisciplinary research and how to overcome disciplinary divides.This episode takes a look at why academic research is trapped in research silos. Ingela Alger (IAST) and Flavio Toxvaerd (Unive…
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This is the fifteenth interview for the Eminent Scholars Archive with an incumbent of the Arthur Goodhart Visiting Professor of Legal Science. Professor McLachlan is Professor of Law at Victoria University of Wellington.Professor McLachlan was interviewed on was interviewed on 19 June and 13 September 2023 in the Squire Law Library.For more informa…
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In this first episode of series 3, Rory Cellan-Jones talks to Dr Anne Degrave, Prof Dennis Grube and Halima Khan about the drivers of short-termism in government, the interplay between voter preferences and policy change and the mechanisms needed to embed longer-term decision-making.This episode unpacks why governments have been trapped in short-te…
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Mohamed El-Erian is the President of Queen’s College Cambridge, and his new book, Permacrisis: A Plan To Fix A Fractured World, is out now.Written with former UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown and Nobel Prize-winning economist Michael Spence, the book is an attempt to understand and explain our world has gone wrong, and presents a plan to better manag…
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What is the future of religion?Rory Cellan-Jones talks to Iza Hussin and Paul Seabright about recent trends in world religions, the interplay between politics and religion, and the economics of religion.This episode unpacks the widespread belief that religion is in decline and explores why this view is mistaken. Leading experts discuss the intersec…
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Rory Cellan-Jones talks to Michael Kenny, Louis Baktash, and Mathieu Carpentier about the governance challenges in France and the United Kingdom, the impact of recent political protests, and whether devolution might be the answer to address these challenges.This podcast examines the constitutional challenges in France and the UK. Leading experts fr…
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Why don’t naked mole-rats feel some kinds of pain and what does this mean for human medicine? Simone Eizagirre Barker talks to Ewan St John about his work studying pain and the extraordinary biology of naked mole-rats which is helping us learn about all sorts of human diseases and uncover potential cures or forms of symptom management.Find out more…
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What is a herbarium and why is it important? Gregory Miller visits Dr Lauren Gardiner and Dr Edwin Rose at the Cambridge University Herbarium to learn more about this fascinating library of plants, who collected them, and why they are so crucial to the study of more than just the natural world.Music by Coby O'Brien Produced by Rebekah King…
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How does nuclear energy work and is it the best way forward for powering out future? Beth King talks to Susannah Lea, Michael Salvini and Hugh Dorward, three members of the CDT PhD team behind the event ‘the Nuclear Energy Futures Fair: an Insight into the Energy of Tomorrow.’ Music by Coby O'BrienProduced by Rebekah King…
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When we say that money is power, what exactly do we mean? Anna Mahtani talks to numismatist and former curator of coins at the British Museum Joe Cribb about the past and future of money. From ancient Chinese coins to cryptocurrencies, what does the study of money tell us about our world and who has power within it? Music by Coby O'BrienProduced by…
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Leading experts from the Bennett Institute and IAST debate emerging technologies like generative AI tools and the metaverse; why there is so much interest, whether we should be excited or worried, and what are the associated policy implications.Sam Gilbert Bennett Institute), César Hidalgo (IAST) and Jeni Tennison (Bennett Institute) talk to podcas…
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Who owns the past and does antiquity really ‘belong’ to anyone?Ella O’Loughlin speaks to Prof Tim Whitmarsh about an event at the Faculty of Classics which will discuss how the classical past is understood and who feels a sense of ownership over it. Find out more about the event here: https://www.festival.cam.ac.uk/events/past-tense-who-does-greek-…
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Why did a female saint rise from her tomb and slap a bellringer across the face? Ella O’Loughlin speaks to Prof Rosalind Love about her recent Cambridge Festival event on female saints and hears some of the vivid stories told about their unique kind of power. Music by Coby O'BrienProduced by Rebekah King…
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Who was the Roman Emperor who rejected Christianity? Amelia Platt speaks to Dr Lea Niccolai from the Faculty of Classics about her talk on Julian the Apostate, an emperor who was raised Christian but rejected the faith and returned to the worship of the Roman gods. Find out more at the Cambridge Festival 2023https://www.festival.cam.ac.uk/events/la…
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Prof David Runciman and Prof Karine Van der Straeten talk to Rory Cellan-Jones about extending voting rights to school-aged children.This episode unpacks the main objections against lowering the legal voting age, the merits of extending democratic rights to children, and how children’s voices might be better represented in electoral processes. Lead…
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Rory Cellan-Jones and leading experts Maria Kleshnina, Daniel Nettle and Amy Orben discuss the drivers of cooperation and how online and offline environments are impacting human behaviour.This episode looks at the main drivers of human behaviour, the difficulties of cooperation for the greater good, and whether those drivers are immutable or have c…
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