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The Americans After Show recaps, reviews and discusses episodes of FX's The Americans. Show Summary: Philip and Elizabeth Jennings are two KGB spies in an arranged marriage who are posing as Americans in suburban Washington, D.C., shortly after Ronald Reagan is elected president. The couple have two children, Paige and Henry, who are unaware of their parents' true identities until they tell Paige after some time has passed. The complex marriage becomes more passionate and genuine each day bu ...
 
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The Mash-Up Americans

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The Mash-Up Americans

The Mash-Up Americans

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The Mash-Up Americans is your guide to the hyphen-America world we all live in. Amy S. Choi and Rebecca Lehrer talk culture, identity, race and what makes us who we are. Get to know yourself, America. We are celebrating and challenging the raucous, colorful, complicated country we live in by asking all the important, awkward questions: What does it mean to be an immigrant in America? What cultural baggage do we bring to sex and relationships? Why is Korean skincare so popular? When does some ...
 
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The Semi-Americans Podcast

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The Semi-Americans Podcast

Eduardo R, Amanuel B & Daniel Y

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Three friends talk about their first-generation experiences in America while navigating through the ups and downs of life. Growing up with immigrant parents can be difficult to comprehend, you may know the feeling. Come enjoy our commentary on the intersectionality of nationality, culture, and family. Twitter: @semiamericans IG: @semiamericanspodcastTikTok: @semiamericanspodcastFacebook: @semiamericanspodcasthttps://linktr.ee/semiamericanspodcast
 
This series is dedicated to delving into the Patriots that never graced your textbooks, signed the Declaration of Independence, or had a movie made about them. This podcast is a deep look into some of the heroes of the Revolution who have long gone unsung; the African Americans who fought for the freedom of a new nation that wouldn't give them theirs for another century.
 
The church and religion has played and continues to play a big role in the African-American community. Yet, many of us who grew up in the traditional black church do not have an understanding of how our faith evolved under the duress of slavery and discrimination to be and to represent what it does today. The purpose of this broadcast is to provide that background knowledge while also pointing out the dividing line between what is just tradition and true faith in Jesus Christ.
 
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“Welcome, Englishmen!” The Pilgrims had had been building houses and establishing defenses for Plymouth for three months before Samoset, an Abenaki sagamore representing the Wampanoag chief Massasoit, marched boldly into town. Until that moment, they had seen a few Indians watching them, but had made no contact. Now, Massasoit had to decide whether…
 
We're baaccccckkkkk!!!! We have so much good stuff coming to you this year - about life and grief and joy. To start - The Mash-Up Americans has produced it's first fiction show Love & Noraebang! It's the most happy, joyful, fun Mash-Up love story starring Randall Park, Justin H. Min and Francia Raisa. Our tagline: The only thing better than karaoke…
 
It is November 11, 1620. The Mayflower has anchored in the harbor at today’s Provincetown, Massachusetts. The passengers and crew of the Mayflower had been stuffed into the small ship for at least ten weeks, and for those who didn’t go ashore in England longer than that. They were eager to get off the ship, explore the region, and find a permanent …
 
Who were the Pilgrims, and how was it that they settled in the Netherlands, only to sail on the Mayflower for the lower Hudson River? And having done that, what was it like on board, and how was it they ended up in New England? All will be revealed, including the story of John Howland, who narrowly escaped death on the crossing and who is today anc…
 
This episode starts at the end of the story of the Pilgrims at Plymouth by looking at the famous “Mayflower Compact,” and how Americans have spoken and written about it for more than 200 years. Was it a “document that ranks with the Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution as a seminal American text,” or merely an expediency f…
 
This year’s Independence Day “Sidebar” episode is about 18 year-old Daniel Webster’s first public speech, on the 4th of July, 1800, in front of an audience of good citizens in Hanover, New Hampshire. The speech is interesting for a number of reasons, including that it shows how early in our history the 4th of July became the national holiday for or…
 
This episode examines the arrival of the first Africans – Angolans, specifically – in English North America on a privateer called the White Lion. We look at the much-debated status of the new arrivals, the circumstances of their arrival, their origins in Angola under unbelievably brutal conditions, their treatment in American history over the last …
 
The year 1619 is a famous one in the history of Virginia. There were two big moments — the introduction of the “Great Charter,” which brought representative government to the future United States for the first time, and the first importation of enslaved Africans in English North America. This episode, Part 1, looks at the innovation of the Great Ch…
 
This episode looks at the kidnapping of Squanto – Tisquantum – in 1614, along with 26 other Wampanoags, in the context of the extraordinarily robust trade between northern Europeans and the tribes along the northeastern Atlantic Coast of North America. Tisquantum would become one of the most important “cosmopolitan” Indians of the era, and in a hor…
 
It is 1614. John Smith of Jamestown fame is now looking for a new gig, and he sets his gimlet eye on the northeast coast of North America. He travels the coast in a small boat, and by 1616 has produced a tract called “A Description of New England” with an accompanying map. He gives New England its name, and makes the case for the English settlement…
 
On May 30, 1931, the Saturday after Memorial Day, the beleaguered President Herbert Hoover addressed a crowd of 20,000 people under sweltering heat at Valley Forge. This episode looks at that speech in the context of Hoover’s life and times. Contemporary listeners will see much that is familiar in Hoover’s speech — politicians are in many ways simi…
 
We are on the road to Plymouth. There are several strands that weave together in 1620, when the Pilgrims on the Mayflower land at an abandoned Indian village known as Patuxet, at a site John Smith had named Plymouth. One of those strands is the rise of dissident Protestantism in England, and the idea that it might best be dealt with by transplantin…
 
Samuel de Champlain returns to New France in 1615, and leads an alliance of Huron and Algonquin tribes into western New York State to attack Onondaga, the heavily fortified heart of Iroquois territory on the site of today's Syracuse. Along the way Champlain goes fishing on Lake Huron and Lake Ontario, and we learn that he was not the first European…
 
We're back after our week off! In this episode we touch on our vacation driving the Natchez Trace, and then proceed briskly to the career of Samuel Argall - Pocahontas's kidnapper - in the service of the Virginia Company and himself. Most importantly, we look at the hilariously devious ruse that Argall deployed in 1613 to "displant" the French colo…
 
On the concluding episode of season 2, the cast reaches out to listeners to help them recap the journey so far. Listeners also share their thoughts on their favorite moments and what they hope to hear discussed in future episodes. Season 2 is a wrap. Check out all the content we've put out till now while we take this much needed break. Shout out to…
 
On this episode, the team starts by discussing their thoughts about weddings before moving on to the news of Elon Musk buying Twitter. What consequences can we expect on a platform with unmonitored free speech? How do we weigh free speech against purposeful misinformation? A complex matter. We then transition to this concept of “otherization.” Why …
 
This episode is a “Sidebar,” which is our term for an episode that is off the timeline of the History of the Americans. This episode centers on a concurring opinion delivered by Justice Neil Gorsuch in a case handed down by the United States Supreme Court only a few days ago, on April 21, 2022. The case, United States vs. Vaello Madero, addresses a…
 
It is late winter, 1616. When last we left our lovers, John and Rebecca Rolfe were in receipt of a request from the Virginia Company to come to London. They had a young son, Thomas, barely a year old, so this must not have been an easy decision to make.This episode is about that trip to London in 1616 and 1617. The young family sailed in April 1616…
 
This episode is about the kidnapping and ransom of Pocahontas in 1613, the romancing of her by John Rolfe, her conversion to Christianity, and their marriage in 1614, which settled the First Anglo-Powhatan War. We look at the two protagonists, their different personalities, their motives, and the extent of their emotional attachment. My primary sou…
 
What was supposed to be an in-depth discussion regarding legacy turns into the interrogation of "Manny Long Legs". Except this time, Amanuel has them a little shook when he starts firing back. While recording this episode, we didn't feel like we talked about much but on the playback we actually covered a lot of ground. Don't miss an episode that in…
 
This episode is a close look at the First Anglo-Powhatan War, which began shortly after John Smith left Jamestown forever in October 1609, and ended as a formal matter with the marriage of Pocahontas and John Rolfe. The war was extremely bloody, if casualties are measured as a percentage of original population, and is noteworthy as the first true w…
 
In Season 2 Episode 13 the trio gets into a discussion about the etymology of names, first discussing the origin of "Korea" and then into the Korean naming convention and multiple tangents from there. Eddie talks about his family nickname and Manny earns a new one "Manny Long Legs". The guys then begin discussing dating taller women and that leads …
 
After the experience of 15 months, 66 substantive episodes, and more than 180,000 aggregate downloads/listens, I thought it would be useful to reintroduce the podcast. I labored over the original introduction and still stand by it, and yet it does not really reflect the tone of the podcast as it has turned out. This episode is therefore a new intro…
 
On part 2 of our episode with author/journalist/activist/insertothercooltitle Jeff Pearce, we discuss his upcoming book The Gifts of Africa releasing worldwide on April 15 (PREORDER tinyurl.com/393kxywx). He writes, “The West will begin to understand Africa when it realizes it’s not talking to a child—it’s talking to its mother.” Unfortunately, lit…
 
Again we digress into the question of privateering and letters of marque, and then take on the stories of the two "sons" whom Christopher Newport and the paramount chief Powhatan exchanged as hostages and emissaries in 1608, the English boy Thomas Savage and the young Powhatan man Namontack. Neither are as famous as Pocahontas or, for that matter, …
 
Another episode, another special guest graces us with their insight! Jeff Pearce (author, journalist, activist, ally for African progress) joins us to discuss his time in Ethiopia at the height of the war waged by the TPLF on Ethiopia (the war still continues...). Jeff was present on the ground in places such as Dessie, Lalibela, and Afar. He spent…
 
In this episode we look at the gruesome "starving time" in Jamestown and the resurgent Powhatan war during the seven months after John Smith's departure in October 1609. The mortality rate at the colony is close to 80% in just that winter, and the incompetence that led to it is breathtaking. Relief comes only with the arrival of two ships from Berm…
 
We have a special guest on this episode of the Semi-Americans Podcast…drum roll…Dr. Mark Spencer, MD. Mark joins us to discuss policing in the United States. This is one of our longer episodes but we honestly could have kept talking for longer (we definitely plan to have him on an episode again in the future). Mark provides great insight to the lac…
 
In Episode 10 Season 2, the trio tries out a new segment where we call our listeners to bring them on air for their outlook and opinions. Our special guest this week is Lorrane Kabert, M.D., please tune in to see what she has to say on the subjects of transparency, commitment, and certainty. This was certainly a very fun and brain-busting episode f…
 
Here come the Dutch! In the busy summer of 1609, English captain Henry Hudson, sailing the Half Moon for the Dutch East India Company, explores the Hudson River from New York Bay to the north of Albany, having numerous encounters, fraught and otherwise, with the local indigenous people along the way. Before he's done Hudson learns the name of that …
 
It is the summer of 1609. Samuel de Champlain has founded Quebec and spent the winter there. During that very difficult time, with its Jamestown-like death rate, he had built strong alliances with the Montaignais, Huron, and other local tribes. The Mohawks, coming up from today's New York State, have been attacking Champlain's allies for many years…
 
Misunderstandings…the root of conflict. In episode 9 of season 2, we discuss the importance of perspective and tolerance. As the trio continues to discuss the current events of the world, we realize that we have a moral obligation to pursue understanding and knowledge from a point of view other than our own. Through open dialogue and conversation, …
 
After a brief digression into current events and a visit to a Ukrainian speakeasy, we accompany Samuel de Champlain to the first settlement of New France, which was in today's Maine, just 1700 feet from Nova Scotia. We also recount his three trips along the coast of New England in 1604, 1605, and 1606, barely missing George Weymouth and the Archang…
 
This week, the trio discusses the current rise of conflicts in the world. Is there ever any justification for war? If so, what is something that you are so passionate about that you would be willing to die for or defend to the end of you? We question why war is normalized in society and whether the rationale of protecting American interests is a sh…
 
In this episode we learn the political and geopolitical foundations of New France and the importance of the beloved King Henri IV to French expansion in North America. We follow Champlain in his youth, including his first adventure in the New World on a Spanish ship, and the circumstances under which he inherited a lot of money. We also meet the re…
 
This week’s episode is our response to a social media comment on whether positions should be based solely on merit. Merit is not the topic that we should be focusing on, as most positions have a barrier of entry via education or licenses that individuals within that job already possess. We believe that it would be imprudent to dismiss that a divers…
 
In this episode we introduce Samuel de Champlain, without whom there might never have been a meaningful French presence in northern North America, largely through the work of the great historian David Hackett Fischer. We also consider Fischer's views on whether history should be useable. Finally, but first, we address listener concerns over my pron…
 
As we take our talents internationally, please join us in this special episode where Eduardo joins us live from his mother country of El Salvador. We discuss some of the sentiments and changes that the past 13 years has reflected upon the country, as well as, Eduardo’s 2 cents for the future development of the nation. If you haven’t already, do a q…
 
In this episode we conclude John Smith's run at Jamestown -- he will depart on October 4, 1609 after a severe injury and, more relevantly, having been demoted after having lost corporate political battles inside the Virginia Company. Along the way we meet the first English women at Jamestown, consider the "coronation" of Powhatan, witness exciting …
 
With the world slowly figuring out a new standard of normalcy, the guys discuss their travel experiences and get an update from Daniel's recent vacation to Puerto Rico. As global citizens, we encourage everyone to practice safe travel measures as we bounce back from isolation and the pandemic. Stay tuned for the entire episode for a special surpris…
 
This is the 57th episode of the podcast, so we take a very brief digression to discuss that milestone. Mostly, this episode looks at the first nine months of 1608, which saw the rise of John Smith to the colony's presidency amid rising tension with the Powhatan Confederacy. To lower that tension, the English and the Powhatans exchange young men in …
 
As you listen to Season 2 Episode 4, we hope you can relate to some of the funny stories that the squad shares from their perspectives while growing up in an immigrant household. As they navigate through their experiences, they touch on the effects of deportation and share their personal experiences with the subject. Lastly, on a lighter note, they…
 
It is late May, 1607, and Jamestown has survived the first organized attack against the settlement, this time from an alliance of five tribes from the Powhatan Confederacy. Captain Christopher Newport and John Smith don't know this yet, because they have taken twenty-two men in their boat and were exploring up the James River. There they hear about…
 
On this episode of the Semi-Americans Podcast, the squad reflects on what they learned from our guest in the last episode, along with their takes on the effects of American/European imperialism. Does leadership have a price? At what point are difficult decisions necessary to lead a country out of dependence? Join us as we discuss these topics. As a…
 
This episode looks at the prophecy that animated Powhatan's consolidation of power in the region, the violent first encounters between the Virginia Company expedition and the indigenous peoples at the mouth of the Chesapeake, internal squabbles within the English leadership, and the bizarre decision by Jamestown's president Edward-Maria Wingfield t…
 
On this episode of the Semi-Americans Podcast, we are joined by special guest Dr. Khaled Kabbara. Khaled gives us a glimpse into his interesting background and life experiences. Originally born in Lebanon, and having spent time in the US and Saudi Arabia, Khaled carries various perspectives and drops knowledge along the way. He also gives us his th…
 
In late December, 1606, in London’s River Thames, three small ships were anchored awaiting a voyage across the Atlantic. Those three ships were the Susan Constant, the Godspeed, and the Discovery, and they would take 105 men and boys to the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay to establish the Virginia Company’s southern colony. They would plunge into a com…
 
On Season 2 Episode 1 of the Semi-Americans Podcast, the trio kicks off with a remote recording session by turning up the spice meter. We discuss our gradients of Americanism to try and understand where we fit on this fluid spectrum, while exploring our cultural and national identities. Through the conversation, we learned that our experiences are …
 
This week we continue and complete our story of the English adventures along the coast of New England in the first decade of the 17th century, including the fate, and the historical debate over the fate, of the Popham Colony, the Virginia Company's sister colony to Jamestown. Along the way we learn about the astonishing origin of the word "Iroquois…
 
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