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A Glimpse into Ancient Ingenuity: Half-Million-Year-Old Wooden Structure Unearthed in Zambia

 
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Manage episode 377551500 series 3444207
Контент предоставлен Kambiz Kamrani. Весь контент подкастов, включая выпуски, графику и описания подкастов, загружается и предоставляется непосредственно Kambiz Kamrani или его партнером по платформе подкастов. Если вы считаете, что кто-то использует вашу работу, защищенную авторским правом, без вашего разрешения, вы можете выполнить процедуру, описанную здесь https://ru.player.fm/legal.

In a groundbreaking discovery that has reshaped our understanding of ancient human life, archaeologists have unearthed half-million-year-old wooden logs along the banks of a river in Zambia. Published in the journal Nature1, these findings suggest that our Stone Age ancestors may have been more advanced and innovative than previously believed, challenging the notion of simple, nomadic lifestyles.

The excavation and analysis of these ancient timber artifacts were led by archaeologist Prof Larry Barham from the University of Liverpool, as part of the Deep Roots of Humanity research project. This remarkable discovery provides evidence that early humans, equipped with intelligence, imagination, and skills, used wood to create structures, marking a significant departure from their previously documented tool-making and fire-starting activities.

The excavation revealed not only ancient wooden tools, such as digging sticks, but also two pieces of wood intersecting at right angles with notches cut into them, clearly shaped by stone tools. These wooden pieces were meticulously crafted to fit together, suggesting their use as structural components.

The age of these wooden artifacts was determined to be approximately 476,000 years old using luminescence dating, a technique based on natural radioactivity. This remarkable preservation was possible due to the waterlogged and essentially pickled conditions in the meandering riverbanks above the Kalambo Falls, near the Zambia-Tanzania border.

The size of these wooden logs, one of which measures about 1.5 meters (5 feet), indicates that they were employed in building something substantial. While the exact purpose remains enigmatic, it is unlikely to have been a permanent dwelling. The structure may have served as a platform for a shelter or a riverside fishing spot.

The identity of the ancient humans, or hominids, responsible for this wooden marvel remains a mystery. No bones have been discovered at the site so far. It could have been Homo sapiens, but it's also possible that different species, such as Homo erectus or Homo naledi, were the architects of this innovation.

Transported to the UK for analysis and preservation, these ancient wooden artifacts are stored in conditions that replicate the waterlogged environment that protected them for half a million years. Eventually, they will return to Zambia for display, enriching the understanding of woodworking traditions in the region and shedding light on the craftsmanship and interactions of ancient humans with their environment.

The discovery of this ancient wooden structure in Zambia highlights the ingenuity and resourcefulness of our early ancestors. It challenges the conventional wisdom of their lifestyles and suggests that they were capable of creating innovative solutions to meet their needs, even in a landscape vastly different from our own. As further research unfolds at the Kalambo Falls site, it holds the potential to deepen our knowledge of ancient woodworking techniques, craftsmanship, and human-environment interactions, offering a captivating glimpse into our shared history.

1

Barham, L., Duller, G.A.T., Candy, I. et al. Evidence for the earliest structural use of wood at least 476,000 years ago. Nature (2023). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-023-06557-9

  continue reading

5 эпизода

iconПоделиться
 
Manage episode 377551500 series 3444207
Контент предоставлен Kambiz Kamrani. Весь контент подкастов, включая выпуски, графику и описания подкастов, загружается и предоставляется непосредственно Kambiz Kamrani или его партнером по платформе подкастов. Если вы считаете, что кто-то использует вашу работу, защищенную авторским правом, без вашего разрешения, вы можете выполнить процедуру, описанную здесь https://ru.player.fm/legal.

In a groundbreaking discovery that has reshaped our understanding of ancient human life, archaeologists have unearthed half-million-year-old wooden logs along the banks of a river in Zambia. Published in the journal Nature1, these findings suggest that our Stone Age ancestors may have been more advanced and innovative than previously believed, challenging the notion of simple, nomadic lifestyles.

The excavation and analysis of these ancient timber artifacts were led by archaeologist Prof Larry Barham from the University of Liverpool, as part of the Deep Roots of Humanity research project. This remarkable discovery provides evidence that early humans, equipped with intelligence, imagination, and skills, used wood to create structures, marking a significant departure from their previously documented tool-making and fire-starting activities.

The excavation revealed not only ancient wooden tools, such as digging sticks, but also two pieces of wood intersecting at right angles with notches cut into them, clearly shaped by stone tools. These wooden pieces were meticulously crafted to fit together, suggesting their use as structural components.

The age of these wooden artifacts was determined to be approximately 476,000 years old using luminescence dating, a technique based on natural radioactivity. This remarkable preservation was possible due to the waterlogged and essentially pickled conditions in the meandering riverbanks above the Kalambo Falls, near the Zambia-Tanzania border.

The size of these wooden logs, one of which measures about 1.5 meters (5 feet), indicates that they were employed in building something substantial. While the exact purpose remains enigmatic, it is unlikely to have been a permanent dwelling. The structure may have served as a platform for a shelter or a riverside fishing spot.

The identity of the ancient humans, or hominids, responsible for this wooden marvel remains a mystery. No bones have been discovered at the site so far. It could have been Homo sapiens, but it's also possible that different species, such as Homo erectus or Homo naledi, were the architects of this innovation.

Transported to the UK for analysis and preservation, these ancient wooden artifacts are stored in conditions that replicate the waterlogged environment that protected them for half a million years. Eventually, they will return to Zambia for display, enriching the understanding of woodworking traditions in the region and shedding light on the craftsmanship and interactions of ancient humans with their environment.

The discovery of this ancient wooden structure in Zambia highlights the ingenuity and resourcefulness of our early ancestors. It challenges the conventional wisdom of their lifestyles and suggests that they were capable of creating innovative solutions to meet their needs, even in a landscape vastly different from our own. As further research unfolds at the Kalambo Falls site, it holds the potential to deepen our knowledge of ancient woodworking techniques, craftsmanship, and human-environment interactions, offering a captivating glimpse into our shared history.

1

Barham, L., Duller, G.A.T., Candy, I. et al. Evidence for the earliest structural use of wood at least 476,000 years ago. Nature (2023). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-023-06557-9

  continue reading

5 эпизода

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